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Getting Smells Out of Ice Skates

by
author image Nicole Vulcan
Nicole Vulcan has been a journalist since 1997, covering parenting and fitness for The Oregonian, careers for CareerAddict, and travel, gardening and fitness for Black Hills Woman and other publications. Vulcan holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and journalism from the University of Minnesota. She's also a lifelong athlete and is pursuing certification as a personal trainer.
Getting Smells Out of Ice Skates
Look out, smelly skates ahead. Photo Credit Ryan McVay/Digital Vision/Getty Images

You might impress the judges with your skills out on the ice but they probably wouldn't be very impressed with the stench coming from your skates once you take them off. If you're having issues with stinky ice skates, it's not a huge surprise given the cold, damp conditions your feet experience while out on the ice. To curb the problem, try one of these approaches.

Insoles

The first thing to try is removing the offending odors. Often the stinkiest part of the boot is the part that is absorbing all your foot's sweat, namely the insole resting at the bottom of your skate's boot. These insoles are often removable. Grab the heel end of the insole and pull up gently to remove the entire insole from the boot. Then replace that old, stinky insole with a new, clean one.

Odor Removers

Another thing to try is an odor remover that works to absorb the odorous molecules that are causing you so much dismay. You can purchase any number of odor-eating products, stick them inside the boot and then enclose the entire boot in a garbage bag for a couple days. If you don't want to spend the money on expensive products, try making your own odor-eater with baking soda, silica gel or borax. Put a half cup of the material in a clean white sock, tie off the sock to keep the odor-eating substance inside, and then place the sock in the skate's boot. To speed up the odor-eating process, again enclose the entire boot in a plastic bag for a couple days.

Sunlight

Another simple home remedy that doesn't cost a dime is sunlight. Putting the skates in the open air with the laces loose or removed and the tongues open wide can help air out the skates, as well as provide heat and sunlight that will dry them out and help carry off odors. On that note, always make sure to dry out your skates completely after use. Moisture can lead to mold, mildew and rot that is not going to help your cause. Place the skates near a heater, or in a pinch, stick the nozzle of a hair dryer down the boot.

Foot Care

Your sweaty feet are the source of some of that foul odor because of fungus and bacteria that may be harboring on them. To cut down on excess sweating that can lead to stinky boots, wear socks made of breathable materials such as cotton or lightweight wool as opposed to polyester, nylon or acrylic socks or tights. If you spend a lot of time each day skating, consider changing your socks in the middle of your workout. If you're showing signs of athlete's foot, talk to your doctor about a medical solution to stop fungal overgrowth that can lead to stinky feet, shoes and skates.

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