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At-Home Exercises to Reduce the Gut

by
author image Linda Freeman Webster
Linda Freeman Webster is a certified personal trainer, group fitness, yoga and Pilates instructor who has been in the fitness industry for 20 years. She has published articles for IDEA Health and Fitness Journal, IDEA Fitness Manager, and USA Hockey Magazine.
At-Home Exercises to Reduce the Gut
Lose your gut and get a sleek mid-section with these at-home exercises. Photo Credit woman"s belly, isolated image by Olga Sapegina from Fotolia.com

In order to lose your gut, both cardiovascular exercise and strength exercise focused on the abdominals are needed. The following exercises combine these two elements for gut-busting effects in minimal time. A general warm-up is recommended, such as walking or jogging in place for three to five minutes, before starting these exercises in order to gain the most benefit from your exercise efforts.

Standing Knee Rotation

Start in a standing position with your feet slightly wider than your shoulders and your arms lifted out to your sides with elbows bent and at shoulder level. Your arms should look like goal posts on a football field. Bring your right knee up toward your belly button as you simultaneously twist your mid-section to bring your left elbow toward your right knee. Return to starting position and switch sides. Continue to alternate sides and keep a brisk pace, performing this exercise for three to five minutes before resting. Stand as tall as you can throughout this movement and exhale with each rotation for effective abdominal toning.

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Plank Run

For the plank run, you will need a sturdy chair, coffee table or weight-lifting bench. Place your hands on the chair, shoulder-width apart and step your feet back until you are in a plank position. In plank position, it is important to keep your hips and butt in line with the rest of your body by engaging your abdominals and preventing sagging in the low back. Pull your shoulders away from your ears by bringing your shoulder blades down as if pulling them into your back pockets and keep your arms straight. This will help stabilize your upper body and help prevent fatigue in the shoulders. To perform the exercise, bring your right foot in toward your right hand, and then simultaneously switch legs as you jump your right foot back and your left foot in. Keep the pace quick, as if you were running in place. For even more gut-busting results, start to add some rotation by bringing your right foot toward your left shoulder and your left foot toward your right shoulder.

Bicycle Roll

To prepare for the bicycle roll, lie on your back with your legs in the air and knees bent over the hips. Your hands should be behind your head and your elbows out to the sides. Pull your abdominals in and curl your head, neck and shoulders off the ground. Begin to bicycle your legs by pressing your right leg out until it is straight and pulling your left knee toward your right shoulder, then simultaneously switch. Focus on twisting through the abdominal area to bring your opposite shoulder in toward the bent knee. Perform 10 on each side, then quickly release to the floor with arms reaching overhead and both legs straight. Roll to your right until you roll onto your stomach, then quickly roll back to the start position for the bicycle. Perform 10 more bicycle movements on each side, then quickly roll to your left until you are on your stomach and roll back again to start position. Perform this a total of four times before resting.

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References

  • "The Personal Trainer's Handbook"; Teri S. O'Brien, MS; 1997
  • "Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Human Movement"; Lawrence A Golding, Phd and Scott M Golding, MS; 2003
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