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What Is Sucrose?

author image Kristeen Cherney
Kristeen Cherney began writing healthy lifestyle and education articles in 2008. Since then, her work has appeared in various online publications, including Healthline.com, Ideallhealth.com and FindCollegeInfo.com. Cherney holds a Bachelor of Arts in communication from Florida Gulf Coast University and is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in English.
What Is Sucrose?
Sucrose is the formal name for household table sugar. Photo Credit Coprid/iStock/Getty Images

Sucrose, also known as table sugar, is commonly made from sugarcane, but may also come from beet juice. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the average American adult gets 14.6 percent of daily energy from added sugars like sucrose. This amount is over twice the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recommendation of 6 percent for a 2,000-calorie diet.

The Natural Aspect of Sucrose

Sucrose is made out of two sugars, fructose and glucose. Known as “fruit sugar,” fructose is found in all types of fruits and honey, as well as a few vegetables. Fruits also contain glucose. Despite coming from nature, sucrose contains few nutrients but is still caloric. Too much sugar consumption may lead to obesity.

Where to Find Sucrose

Sucrose is widely available in forms of table sugar, including raw and granulated sugars. It is also found in confectioner’s sugar, brown sugar and unrefined turbinado sugar. Table sugar is often used as an additive in food processing and preparation, so read ingredient labels carefully.

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