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Cereals Containing Psyllium

by
author image Carolyn Russell-DeLucas
Based in Massachusetts, Carolyn Russell-DeLucas has been writing since 2007. She specializes in topics related to health, beauty and nutrition. Russell-DeLucas graduated from Brevard Community College with an Associate of Arts.
Cereals Containing Psyllium
Cereals containing psyllium Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

Psyllium is a plant grown in India that contains fiber similar to oat bran. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration released information on the potential of psyllium reducing heart disease and allowed cereal manufacturers to advertise its heart benefit. In addition, psyllium can help to relieve constipation, and diarrhea and is used to help treat the symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome, hemorrhoids and intestinal disorders, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Currently, several cereals on the market contain psyllium.

All-Bran Buds

All-Bran Buds is a product of Kellogg's. The cereal was introduced in the 1960s, and gained popularity in the late 1980s when psyllium started showing heart-health benefits. All-Bran Buds is available in your local grocery stores in the United States and Canada. The advertisement on the front box of the cereal expresses that you will get as much as 51 percent of daily fiber in one serving, which is one-third cup of cereal.

Smart Bran

Smart Bran contains psyllium, oat bran and wheat bran. Nature's Path introduced the cereal to the market and states that you can consume 13 grams of organic fiber per serving. If you're searching for an organic, heart-healthy cereal, Nature's Path advertises that Smart Bran is USDA Organic.

Heartwise / Fiberwise

Kellogg's introduced Heartwise to the public in 1989, but changed the name to Fiberwise due to objections by the FDA that the word "heart" in a brand name implied unsubstantiated health benefits. This brand of cereal was Kellogg's second attempt in introducing a cereal containing psyllium to the market, but due to the negative publicity, the cereal was discontinued and taken off the shelves in 1993.

Benefit

Benefit hit the market in 1989 and was General Mills' version of a heart-healthy cereal containing psyllium. During the year of release, the FDA challenged the advertisement claims on Benefit's box front. The cereal manufacturer removed Benefit from the shelves in December 1989 after the FDA inquired about the claims.

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