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Free Basketball Weight Lifting Program

by
author image Jason Aberdeene
Jason Aberdeene has been a freelance writer since 2008. His articles have appeared in the "UCSD Guardian" and on various websites, specializing in teen health. An assistant at Kagan Physical Therapy since 2009, Aberdeene has a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from the University of California, San Diego.
Free Basketball Weight Lifting Program
Strength training helps to prevent in-season injuries Photo Credit basketball image by Marianna Poloskei from Fotolia.com

A successful basketball weight lifting program will help you work all of the muscles and reflexes that you use during a game. Weight lifting programs differ, depending on whether they are for during your season on or the off-season. During the off-season, you will tend to focus your workouts on building up endurance as well as upper and lower body strength. Off-season workouts help you to prepare for the physical stresses your body will face during the regular season. During the regular season, basketball weight lifting programs refine and tone the muscles that you have built up during the off-season.

Incline Dumbbell Bench Press

This incline dumbbell bench press workout helps you to strengthen your biceps as well as your pecs and upper body. Start by lying down on a declined bench press with one dumbbell on each side. Keep your back flat on the bench press as you reach for the two weights. Put the weights together like a barbell and push out, fully extending your arms. Do two sets of 10 repetitions, making sure to pause between each set. NBA player Matt Harpring recommends using lighter weights to prevent from getting sore on game days and practices.

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Single Leg Presses

Single leg presses help to strengthen and tone your legs individually. Sit down in a leg press machine and extend one of your legs. Push forward to release the full weight of the leg press machine. With your other foot resting on the floor, bring your leg halfway down the leg press and then push up. Perform three sets of 10 for both legs, making sure to break between sets. According to personal trainer Johnny Doyle, this drill helps to prevent tendonitis by strengthening your quadriceps. Increase the weight of the leg press as you built up strength in your quads and legs.

Standard Bench Press

The standard bench press will help you to develop your upper body as well as your wrists and biceps. Start by selecting the overall weight you are going to put on the barbell. Conditioning coach Al Biancani recommends using lighter weights and more repetitions to prevent players from getting too bulky. After you have chosen your weight, lie down on the bench and place your hands on the barbell. If possible, have a spotter help you lift the bar off the bench press rack. Bring the barbell down to your chest and then push it up until your arms are fully extended. Perform three sets of 10 repetitions.

Calf Raises

Calf raises increase individual quickness and speed through strengthening. Start with both of your feet planted firmly on a step. Back up so that the heels of both feet are hanging off the step. Lower the backs of your feet until you feel your calves tighten. Push back up with the balls of your feet and repeat this exercise 10 times. Perform three to four sets, leaving plenty of time in between to rest. Strength training exercises such as this one help to reduce your risk of in-game injuries.

Back Fly

Back flyes help you strengthen your shoulder muscles as well as your triceps. Start by standing up straight with a dumbbell in each hand. Raise your arms out to the sides of your body to about shoulder height. Bring them back down and repeat. Perform three sets of 15 at the beginning and end of each one of your workout sessions. Performing this exercise in front of a mirror helps you make sure that you are using the correct form.

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