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What Is the Meaning of Child Rearing?

by
author image Julie Boehlke
Julie Boehlke is a seasoned copywriter and content creator based in the Great Lakes state. She is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists. Boehlke has more than 10 years of professional writing experience on topics such as health and wellness, green living, gardening, genealogy, finances, relationships, world travel, golf, outdoors and interior decorating. She has also worked in geriatrics and hospice care.
What Is the Meaning of Child Rearing?
Raising a child takes involvment, love and persistance year after year. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Stockbyte/Getty Images

Child rearing can be both difficult and rewarding at the same time. The goal of every parent is to have your child grow up to be a respectable and resourceful adult in society. Building a sturdy character in your child takes time, parental involvement and unconditional support and love, but your investment will help provide your child with the best possible start in life.

Discipline

Effective discipline is one of the building blocks of child rearing. Discipline is different from abuse. Abuse is wrong and consists of physically and mentally hurting your child. Effective discipline involves punishing with a loving heart and being persistent about the consequences of right and wrong, according to the All About Parenting website. Discipline plays an important part in child rearing, because it helps the child develop an understanding of right and wrong behavior.

Guidance

Proper guidance helps your child grow, develop and respond to life in a positive way. Many children learn by example, so it is important for you to have a positive approach. According to the Canadian Childcare Federation, important goals of child guidance include helping your child gain control of his emotions, learn self-discipline, solve problems, gain independence and interact with his peers in a positive manner.

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Spirituality

Many families base their everyday lives on spirituality and religious beliefs. If your family is religious, it might be important to you to raise your child with the same beliefs. Discuss your spiritual beliefs daily and attend services as a family, if possible. Enroll your child in religious classes to learn more about her faith. Model your spiritual beliefs for your child by living them daily. Let your child witness you prioritizing your beliefs and putting them into practice. Answer questions with as much detail as possible when your child asks questions about your faith.

Education

Making sure your child gets a good education is an important part of child rearing. Your child needs a good education not only for academic learning, but also to learn how to interact with her peers and with authority figures. Raising a good child also means teaching her to showcase a mutual respect between herself and her teachers, according to the Education website. It is important to follow up with your child on a regular basis about her educational needs. Make sure she attends school every day, keeps up with her homework, receives proper nutrients and gets plenty of rest.

Goals

According to the At Health website, parents might have slightly different goals based on different parenting styles. But in general, most parents want their child to be intelligent, engaged in a broad variety of activities, and independent and respectful of others. Child rearing changes as your child enters different stages of childhood and early adulthood. No matter what stage, though, staying involved in his life in a supportive and positive manner can help him become a better person.

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