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What Is the Difference Between D-Biotin and Biotin?

by
author image Joelle DiTucci
Based in Berkeley, Calif., Registered Dietitian Joelle DiTucci received her Master's degree in nutrition, and enjoys her work as an eating disorder dietitian, support group leader, writer and a Rise coach. Her main interests are in recipe creation, disordered eating, psychology and intuitive eating.
What Is the Difference Between D-Biotin and Biotin?
Organic rainbow chard thriving in the garden. Photo Credit Shane Folkertsma/iStock/Getty Images

D-biotin is the naturally occurring, biologically active form of the B vitamin biotin. It's involved in lipid, protein and carbohydrate metabolism. Because biotin is relatively plentiful among foods and your intestines are even able to produce it, a deficiency is rare and supplements are usually unnecessary unless your doctor recommends them. Foods rich in biotin include eggs, dairy products, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, wheat bran, whole-wheat bread, wild salmon, Swiss chard, cauliflower, avocados and raspberries.

D-Biotin Versus Biotin

D-biotin is one of eight forms of the water-soluble vitamin, biotin, also known as vitamin B-7. It is a coenzyme -- or helper enzyme -- for numerous metabolic reactions in the body. D-biotin is involved in lipid and protein metabolism and helps convert food into glucose, which the body uses for energy. It's also vital for maintaining skin, hair and mucous membranes

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