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How to Stop Nausea Caused By Birth Control

by
author image Erica Roth
Erica Roth has been a writer since 2007. She is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists and was a college reference librarian for eight years. Roth earned a Bachelor of Arts in French literature from Brandeis University and Master of Library Science from Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science. Her articles appear on various websites.
How to Stop Nausea Caused By Birth Control
How to Stop Nausea Caused By Birth Control Photo Credit Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images

Birth control pills and patches, known as hormonal birth control, deliver a steady dose of estrogen and progesterone to a women's body to prevent ovulation. As a response to the added hormones, some women experience nausea as a side effect of their birth control choice. Finding the birth control method that is right for you may take some time, but this process may help stop the nausea that is caused by your pills or patch.

Step 1

Eat a light snack such as crackers or a piece of fruit when you take your birth control. An empty stomach can cause or intensify feelings of nausea, and that may be alleviated with a small amount of food.

Step 2

Take your birth control pill at night and assess if your nausea subsides. According to the student health services at Brown University, many women experience more nausea when taking their pills in the morning than at night. Try to take your pills at the same time every day so you'll remember to take them, regardless of what time that is.

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Step 3

Wait it out if your nausea is only intermittent and mild. Usually within a few weeks of beginning a particular hormonal birth control method, your body adjusts to the hormone levels and the nausea will go away.

Step 4

Experiment with different brands of pills or patches if your nausea is severe. Birth control patches generally deliver more estrogen to your system than pills, which can increase your discomfort. Speak to your gynecologist about switching to an oral contraceptive that contains a low dose of estrogen. Lower-estrogen pills still protect against pregnancy and may not make you feel sick.

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