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Pressure Points in the Legs

author image Denise Stern
Denise Stern is an experienced freelance writer and editor. She has written professionally for more than seven years. Stern regularly provides content for health-related and elder-care websites and has an associate and specialized business degree in health information management and technology.
Pressure Points in the Legs
Woman lying down and getting a foot massage. Photo Credit Dmitry Rukhlenko/Hemera/Getty Images


Because of gravity, your legs may not receive the best circulation, especially if you have to be on your feet or sit at a computer for eight or more hours every day. You can help increase blood flow to the lower extremities and relieve sluggish arteries by performing self- or professional acupressure on various points of the legs. From the top of your thighs to your ankles, traditional Chinese medicine and acupressure and acupuncture therapies utilize pressure points to help restore and promote healthy blood and lymph circulation.

Wei Zhong

Pressure Points in the Legs
Pressure points in the legs promote circulation and pain relief. Photo Credit George Doyle/Stockbyte/Getty Images

The wei zhong pressure point is in the soft part on the back of your leg, directly behind the knee joint. Also known as Bladder 40, this pressure point manipulates the popliteal artery, which in turn supplies blood to smaller arteries along the front side of the lower leg or shin area, according to Dr. Ben Kim. Press this point with the pad of your thumb or index finger for about one minute to promote and maintain good blood flow and circulation to your lower legs.


The pressure point commonly known as ST-36 is found along the front of the shin, about four finger widths below the center of the kneecap, according to Dr. Kim. This pressure point also helps restore healthy flow of blood and lymph to the lower legs and may help relieve pain and stiffness caused by shin splints, which are inflammation of lower leg muscles along the front of the calf.

Three Yin Intersection

Also known as Spleen 6, according to the Institute for Integrative Healthcare Studies, the Three Yin Intersection is about three fingers' width above the top of the medial malleolus, or the lower end of the tibia or lower leg where it joins the ankle toward the inside of the body, or medial aspect. This pressure point is believed to be the intersection of the kidney, liver and spleen channels that promote nourishment for the blood and may be manipulated to help treat anxiety, abdominal cramping, and headaches.

Leg Three Miles

The Leg Three Miles pressure point, also known as the Stomach 36, is found just below the inside of the kneecap, about one finger width away from the side of the shin bone, or tibia. Massaging this area helps relieve leg fatigue and helps build and restore energy, according to the Institute for Integrative Healthcare Studies. Manipulation of this point has also been performed to relieve numbness in the lower legs and digestive issues such as diarrhea and constipation.

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