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Dermatologist Recommended Skin Care Lines

by
author image Bonnie Singleton
Bonnie Singleton has been writing professionally since 1996. She has written for various newspapers and magazines including "The Washington Times" and "Woman's World." She also wrote for the BBC-TV news magazine "From Washington" and worked for Discovery Channel online for more than a decade. Singleton holds a master's degree in musicology from Florida State University and is a member of the American Independent Writers.
Dermatologist Recommended Skin Care Lines
With so many skin care products on the market, consumers look to dermatologists for advice. Photo Credit face cream image by PinkShot from Fotolia.com

With the cosmeceuticals market estimated to pass $17.2 billion this year, the staggering array of skin-care products available can be confusing. New York University dermatologist Mary Ellen Brademas adds that the lack of rigorous published science on cosmetics makes it difficult to determine just how all those products work. This is one of the reasons so many women rely upon dermatologists for advice. Complicating matters is the fact dermatologists don't always agree on the best products, and some doctors only promote products they sell. A good place to start, then, are the brands that seem to be recommended most frequently.

Aveeno

The Aveeno company has been around since 1945, and the Mayo Clinic was the brand's first customer for its moisturizing bath additive. The doctors of Dermatology Associates in Tinley Park, Illinois, include Aveeno Clear Complexion Foaming Cleanser, Cleansing Pads, Positively Radiant Moisturizer and Ultra-Calming Moisturizer among the products they recommend for their patients with acne-prone skin. The American Academy of Dermatology bestowed their Seal of Approval on two Aveeno sunblocks, among the few products given that designation.

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Cetaphil

Cetaphil is one of the most frequently recommended cleansers by doctors, especially for patients with skin conditions and diseases like rosacea, eczema or dermatitis. Cetaphil products are generally non-comedogenic, meaning they won't clog pores, and are free from fragrances, parabens, lanolin and mineral oil, ingredients that can aggravate sensitive skin. Cetaphil cleansers and creams have been given awards by the National Eczema Association, and the Skin Cancer Foundation called out Cetaphil's UVA/UVB Defense SPF 50 sunscreen for special honors.

Neutrogena

Neutrogena's products are mostly non-comedogenic, hypoallergenic and fragrance-free, making them excellent choices for most skin types. The Kansas University Medical Center's Dermatologist's Guide to Cosmetics recommends Neutrogena's Non-Drying Cleansing Lotion as a first choice for facial cleansers. New York City dermatologist Arielle Kauvar endorses Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry-Touch Sunblock SPF 70 with Helioplex for its ability to block both UVA and UVB rays.

Olay

Olay has several products that don't contain soap, oils, dyes or fragrances, as well as being pH-balanced to help skin retain its natural moisture. The Face and Skin Center at the University of Mississippi and the Tinley Park Dermatology Associates have several Olay products on their recommended lists, and Dr. Kauvar singles out Olay's Total Effects 7-in-1 Anti-Aging Nourishing Cream Cleanser. In a February 2010 issue of the British Journal of Dermatology, Olay Professional Pro-X regimen was compared to a 0.02 percent tretinoin solution in a clinical trial and found to improve the appearance of facial lines and wrinkles as well as the prescription regimen.

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