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Bad Breath and Stomach Problems

author image Jamie Mastrangelo
Jamie Mastrangelo has been writing since 2003. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications at Pace University where she served as managing editor of her college newspaper. Mastrangelo is studying to become an English teacher at Ramapo College of New Jersey. She writes health and feature articles.
Bad Breath and Stomach Problems
A woman is testing her breath. Photo Credit Tharakorn/iStock/Getty Images

Bad breath can be an embarrassing problem. Often, brushing your teeth is not enough to get rid of odors in your mouth. Your mouth is only one part of the digestive tract. The stomach can have an effect on breath, too. It is not uncommon that problems in the stomach can lead to halitosis.


Bacteria don't just live in your mouth. According to BadBreathstomach.com, helicobacter Pylori is a form of bacteria that is a root cause of stomach ulcers. While it has not been proved that helicobacter Pylori is accountable for mouth odor, it is certainly considered. On the other hand, having levels of bacteria in the stomach that are too low also can cause bad breath. According to HSP Online, "When lactobacillus levels are low in the colon, partially digested food decays, producing foul gas, toxemia, and consequently bad breath." Without bacteria to break it down, food sits in your stomach for years and becomes toxic.


To prevent halitosis, it is recommended to maintain proper oral hygiene. Brushing your teeth daily, flossing, and visiting a dentist every six months for a routine check-up and cleaning all help to prevent bad breath. In addition, brushing your teeth after every meal is recommended. However, preventing halitosis does not end with oral hygiene. Again, the mouth is only part of the digestive system and it is important not to neglect what we put in our stomachs. Avoid consuming spicy and strong-smelling foods such as garlic and onions. Stay away from alcohol and cigarettes, as well. Belching can bring up these odors.


In addition to visiting your dentist, it is wise to see your doctor about foul-smelling breath and your stomach conditions. According to Consumer Reports, any problem with your digestive system can affect your breath. Heartburn, for example, may cause stomach acid and gas to travel back up into your throat and cause odor. A doctor will be able to provide advice and medication for a specific digestive disorder that may be affecting you.

Alternative Treatment

While it is recommended to see a doctor about your halitosis and stomach problems, some chose to treat their problems naturally. Natural-HomeRemedies.org recommends eating rock salt and crushed celery leaves to treat stomach disorders. Another suggestion is to drink lemon and ginger juices for relief. Other tips are to keep your diet simple and eat lots of leafy greens and enough fiber for digestion. Don't overload your stomach and only eat to your capacity. These things will help to keep your digestive system regular and prevent sources of bad breath from the stomach.


If you are brushing your teeth several times per day or using mouthwash and other breath-freshening products but your halitosis prevails, it may be an internal problem. Bad breath can also be a sign of other serious health problems such as gum disease, sinusitus, diabetes, and even liver or kidney disease. Consult your dentist and doctor if you have concerns about bad breath.

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