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Water Aerobics Pool Exercises

by
author image Lori Rice
Lori Rice is a freelance health and travel writer. As an avid traveler and former expat, she enjoys sharing her experiences and tips with other enthusiastic explorers. Rice received a master's degree in nutritional sciences and a bachelor’s degree in nutrition, fitness and health.
Water Aerobics Pool Exercises
Three people practicing water aerobics. Photo Credit kzenon/iStock/Getty Images

Overview

Exercising in a pool provides a cardiovascular workout that is beneficial to joints and muscles. The buoyancy provided by the water makes standing exercise easier on the joints of the hips and knees. The water also provides resistance for arms and legs, strengthening the muscles. Regardless of whether you prefer the shallow or deep end of the pool, there are a variety of water aerobic exercises you can perform to create a healthy workout.

Jumping Jacks in Shallow Water

Stand in a water level that comes somewhere between your stomach and chest. Start with your feet together and then begin jumping out and in like you would for a jumping jack on land. This movement will be slower because you will have to move your legs through the resistance of the water. You can keep your arms in the water and move them through a small range of motion, out and back down to your sides. You can also raise them out of the water using a full range of motion. The arms go out as the legs go out. Do jumping jacks for three to five minutes and you can return to this move between switching to new exercises throughout your workout.

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Group Circles in Shallow Water

Stand in a water level that comes somewhere between your stomach and chest. If you are with a group, stand in a circle with everyone facing each other. Marching or jogging, everyone should move in towards each other and then backpedal out and away from each other. Repeat this five times. Next, turn to the right and everyone move in a circle, marching or jogging to the right. Do three circles and then turn and move the other direction. Continue to repeat the series for five minutes. You can also do these same moves alone without a group.

Cross-Country Ski in Deep Water

Put on a weight belt commonly used in water aerobics to help support you in deep water. Your feet should not be able to touch the ground for this exercise. Begin scissoring the legs forward and back, keeping them straight as if you were skiing cross-country on land. For your arms, you can use pool dumbbells or no weights at all. Move the arms under the water scissoring them, just like your legs. Keep your arms straight and their range of motion should allow them to come up almost to the surface of the pool and back down to your sides moving slightly behind the body. Aim to move with this exercise and not just stay in one place. Move to one side of the pool, turn around and go back. Continue this for 10 minutes, but you can switch up the arm and leg movements to avoid getting bored, such as with the move listed next.

Knees to Chest and Heels to Bottom in Deep Water

Put on a weight belt commonly used in water aerobics to help support you in deep water. Your feet should not be able to touch the ground for this exercise. Begin moving forward by jogging in the water and bringing your knees high to your chest. Move to one end of the pool, turn around. Come back to your starting spot by now jogging while kicking your heels back to your bottom. You can use small pool dumbbells or none at all. Simply pump your arms naturally under the water as you would while jogging on ground. Combine this with Cross-Country Ski and other moves for 10 minutes.

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References

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