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How to Write a Resume Objective for a Non-Specific Job

by
author image Kay Ireland
Kay Ireland specializes in health, fitness and lifestyle topics. She is a support worker in the neonatal intensive care and antepartum units of her local hospital and recently became a certified group fitness instructor.
How to Write a Resume Objective for a Non-Specific Job
An job interviewee sits opposite the interviewer who has his hand on a pen to the resume. Photo Credit NAN104/iStock/Getty Images

While a resume complete with career objective shows that you want a specific position at a specific company, if you're sending out multiple resumes you may want to write your objective in a non-specific way. By focusing on your abilities in a broader fashion, you don't have to change your objective each time you want to apply for a job. You can create a resume appropriate for any number of jobs so your resume is always ready to be placed in the right hands at the right time.

Step 1

Consider what most employers want from their employees and tailor your objective accordingly. Certain traits are valuable in all businesses, like teamwork, dependability and independence. Include adjectives that work for virtually any job to make you seem more desirable as an employee. You'll have time to elaborate on them when you secure an interview. Remember that the objective tells the employer what you can do for him, and not what he can do for you, warns the Network Services & Consulting Corporation.

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Step 2

Specify the skills and technology that make you a valuable employee to any employer, suggests Katharine Hansen, creative director and associate publisher of Quintessential Careers. Remember to be specific about what you offer. Instead of writing that you're "technologically-minded," list the types of software in which you are proficient, such as "Proficient in MS Office, Camtasia Studio and AutoCAD." This shows any employer your knowledge and skills.

Step 3

Utilize skill keywords that get you noticed by any prospective employer, suggests CVTips.com. Certain words like "Manager," "experienced" and "development" show the various employers that you have years of experience behind you and you've worked in managerial positions in the past. These are both desirable traits in an employee and could get your resume moved to the top of the pile.

Step 4

Choose verbs that will impress a prospective employer, remembering that results and action are often held in higher esteem than knowledge and education. The Georgia Institute of Technology notes that using words like "creating," "training," and "instituting" shows a prospective employee that you obtain results as an employee and would be a valuable addition to any team based on your past performance.

Step 5

Create a formulaic objective for your resume that you can tweak according to the position that you're applying for. While all of the information may stay the same, you could substitute the type of position that you're looking for based on the company you're applying with so your objective is slightly personalized while still staying non job-specific.

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References

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