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Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds

by
author image Annie Summers
Annie Summers began writing educational materials in 1975. She covers medical topics for various websites and authors public health materials. Summers is registered and certified as a medical/surgical assistant and EKG technician. She is also licensed as a pharmacy technician.
Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Even small cuts require attention. Photo Credit sports injury image by Sirena Designs from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

You've cut your hand or your child has scraped her knee. These are acute wounds. Whenever possible, they should be cleaned and treated immediately with an antiseptic to prevent infection. The textbook Pharmacology for Nursing Care includes information about many of the common skin antiseptics. However, if the wound shows signs of infection, please get medical attention right away.

Soap

Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Wash your hands before treating wounds. Photo Credit washing hands image by Julia Britvich from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

All soap cleans, but antibacterial soap is a mild antiseptic as well as a cleaner. Wash your own hands first. Then wash the entire area of the injury to prevent nearby skin bacteria from contaminating the wound. Rinse liberally with clean water or 0.9 percent sterile saline solution, which is easier on the damaged skin. Always keep a wound clean until you can cover it properly.

Alcohol

Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Cover wounds to keep them clean. Photo Credit benda per ferita image by Michele Campini from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Alcohol is a good antiseptic, but damaging to tissues. A 70 percent isopropyl or ethyl alcohol solution will kill germs and is ideal for cleaning around a wound. It will sting if it gets in the wound. Hand sanitizer gels, sprays or wipes may be used in this way also.

Witch Hazel

Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Witch hazel can reduce swelling Photo Credit Bottle image by SIN from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Witch hazel has some alcohol content, but not enough to be considered a true antiseptic. It does clean the skin, and according to the Professional's Handbook of Complementary & Alternative Medicines, it helps to stop bleeding and reduce swelling. It can be applied with a cotton ball that remains on the skin as a compress, if desired.

Hydrogen Peroxide

Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Peroxide is no longer considered a skin antiseptic. Photo Credit brown bottle image by Jim Mills from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Hydrogen peroxide actually damages tissues and retards healing. It is no longer considered a skin antiseptic, but can be used to help remove debris from deep or dirty wounds. Wash deep or dirty wounds with soap and flush well with water or sterile saline if available. Use peroxide if clean water isn't available. Follow-up with an antiseptic.

Benzethonium chloride

Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Lidocaine in some products do help with pain. Photo Credit Crying Little girl image by Olga Sapegina from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Benzethonium chloride is sold under several trade names, including salanine, BZT and diapp. It has been shown to be effective against Staph bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. The FDA indicates that benzethonium chloride should be used in limited amounts and is not recommended for antibacterial soaps and body washes.

Benzalkonium chloride

Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Cotton swabs can be used to apply antiseptics. Photo Credit q-tips image by Alx from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Benzalkonium chloride wipes may be in your first aid kit. It is the safest product to use around the eyes, but should not be allowed to get in the eyes. There is a risk of becoming allergic to it with prolonged use.

Povidone iodine

Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Even a small kit can be useful. Photo Credit aid compact kit image by anders tanger from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Povidone iodine is a safe and effective antiseptic for almost everyone, but should not be used if there is an allergy to iodine or seafood. It is painted on with a cotton swab or a pre-soaked pad. It is available at drugstores in liquid form as well as swabs or pads. Povidone iodine does tint the skin and can stain fabric.

Chlorhexidine gluconate

Using Antiseptics in Acute Wounds
Chlorhexidine gluconate is a popular surgical prep solution. Photo Credit operation in a process image by Andrey Kiselev from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Chlorhexidine gluconate is considered a safe and highly effective skin antiseptic. It must not be allowed to enter the ears as it can damage hearing. It can otherwise be applied liberally to the wound and surrounding area and allowed to dry on the skin. It has a residual antibacterial action, so new bacteria will not grow in or around the wound for up to six hours. This product is available in several brands and forms at all pharmacies.

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