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Weight Lifting on a Fat Loss Diet

by
author image Martin Green
Based in London, Martin Green has written news, health and sport articles since 2008. His articles have appeared in “Essex Chronicle," “The Journal” and various regional British newspapers. Green holds a Master of Arts in creative writing from Newcastle University and a Bachelor of Arts in English literature.
Weight Lifting on a Fat Loss Diet
Sticking to a strict diet and regularly lifting weights helps shed unwanted pounds. Photo Credit working out with dumbbell image by MAXFX from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Weightlifting helps you lose fat and gain muscle in its place, leaving you with lean muscle mass across your body. But weightlifting alone will not cause you to lose any fat unless you complement it with a strict diet. You need to plan your meals around weightlifting sessions, and choose foods that give you the energy to train to your potential. Choosing the right carbohydrates, protein and fat is vital.

Function

You want to lose fat and be left with a muscular appearance. To achieve this, you have to plan your meals and learn which foods are nutritious and stimulate muscle growth without putting unnecessary fat into your body, and ultimately you have to resist the temptation to eat junk food. A weightlifting fat loss diet should see you losing a pound or two per week in overall weight. Any more than that is unhealthful. However, fat already stored on your body will turn into muscle, which weighs more than fat, so even if your weight does not change too dramatically, your appearance will.

Foods

Protein stimulates muscle growth and, according to Bodybuildingforyou.com, it boosts your metabolism, burns fat and maintains lean muscle tissue. The trick is to eat food high in protein but low in fat, such as turkey, chicken and fish. But not all fat is bad for you. According to Bodybuilding.com, monounsaturated fat gives you a tighter waist and leaner muscles by helping your liver filter out cholesterol. Avocados, nuts, olive oil and oily fish are a good source of monounsaturated fat. Carbohydrates give you the energy to lift weights and help you lose fat, but avoid refined carbohydrates like white bread. Opt for wholemeal bread, whole grain cereals and wild rice instead. Fruit and vegetables dilute and flush out deposits of fat on your body, so eat at least five portions a day.

Significance

Experts believe diet accounts for around 90 percent of your success in losing fat. Weightlifting is an effective way of burning fat, but a healthful, balanced, low-fat diet is the key to losing fat. Losing fat and building up muscle in its place requires lifestyle changes. You need to buy expensive foods, lift weights and take other forms of exercise most days, plan your meals and say no to alcohol, refined carbohydrates, unsaturated fat and candy. But if you are disciplined, the results will be worth it.

Benefits

By sticking to a strict weightlifting fat loss diet, your appearance will improve, and you will be more agile, energetic and motivated. Eating monounsaturated fat improves liver function and stops your arteries clogging up. The nutrients your body absorbs on this type of diet help fend off cancer, stroke, heart disease and diabetes.

Considerations

Eat six or seven meals smaller a day instead of the typical three. This speeds up your metabolism and helps you lose weight. You have to be disciplined to fit this into your day, but it is vital if you want to shed fat. You should also be drinking plenty of water. This keeps your muscles hydrated, breaks down fat and stops you from feeling hungry.

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