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High Protein Snack Foods

by
author image Jill Lee
Jill Lee has been working as a Web writer since 2007. Her favorite topics include fitness, nutrition, pets, gardening and technology. She also works as a medical transcriptionist. Lee is currently pursuing a degree in health information management at Western Nebraska Community College.
High Protein Snack Foods
Nuts, such as almonds, are rich in protein and contain healthy fats. Photo Credit Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

Whether you're a fitness buff or could stand to lose a few pounds, incorporating protein-rich foods into your daily snacks can help you reach your goals. Eating a high-protein snack after working out helps repair and build muscles. Snacks high in protein help you feel full, which can reduce the urge to snack on unhealthy foods. A 2013 study published in "Appetite" found that women who ate an afternoon snack high in protein felt fuller for a longer period than those who consumed no snack and those who ate a snack lower in protein.

Meaty Snacks

High Protein Snack Foods
A can of tuna openend Photo Credit horex/iStock/Getty Images

If you typically think of meat as a strictly "meal food," you might want to change your perspective. A small snack that includes meat can help stave off hunger until your next meal, helping you keep control so you don't overindulge from feeling famished. Stick to lean meats, like turkey and fish, to keep calories and unhealthy fats low. Try spreading some tuna or salmon on whole wheat crackers or brown rice cakes. A 3-ounce serving of canned tuna contains 22 grams of protein per serving. Roll up some deli meat in a lettuce leaf or a whole wheat tortilla for a protein snack on the run.

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Dairy Delights

High Protein Snack Foods
Bowl of greek yogurt on napkin Photo Credit Lilyana Vynogradova/iStock/Getty Images

Choose low-fat dairy products to get the benefits of protein without the extra calories. A 1-ounce slice of low-fat mozzarella contains just under 7 grams of protein, low-fat Swiss has about 8 grams per ounce and a 1/2-cup serving of low-fat, 1 percent cottage cheese has 14 grams. Include some cheese wrapped in a slice of deli meat or snack on a small bowl of cottage cheese with fruit. Yogurt is another good protein-rich snack. When eating yogurt, go for Greek varieties to add extra protein. A 6-ounce container of plain, nonfat Greek yogurt has just over 17 grams of protein.

Nosh on Nuts and Seeds

High Protein Snack Foods
Pistachios Photo Credit fpwing/iStock/Getty Images

Nuts are satiating because they're high in protein, and they make a great snack when you're on the go or tied to your desk at work. Based on 1-ounce servings, peanuts contain 7 grams, and almonds, pistachios and sunflower seeds have 6 grams. Make sure to watch your portion sizes with nuts -- they're high in fat as well as protein. Separate servings into small bags you can grab quickly. If eating nuts and seeds plain isn't your thing, try sprinkling a few into yogurt or cottage cheese, or spread nut butter on apple slices or celery sticks.

Protein From Plants

High Protein Snack Foods
Edamame Photo Credit Cindy Chen/iStock/Getty Images

Plant-based proteins are low in saturated fat. They're also alkaline, which may help reduce inflammation and protect your bones, explains "U.S. News & World Report." Snack on a cup of edamame for nearly 17 grams of protein with only 189 calories. Other beans and lentils are also high in protein and make good choices for snacking. Make a small bean burrito with a whole-grain tortilla or dip a wheat pita in hummus, which contains about 10 grams of protein per 1/2 cup.

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