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Natural Remedies for Bladder Spasms

author image Jennifer Byrne
Jennifer Byrne is a freelance writer and editor specializing in topics related to health care, fitness, science and more. She attended Rutgers University. Her writing has been published by KidsHealth.org, DietBlogTalk.com, Primary Care Optometry News, and EyeWorld Magazine. She was awarded the Gold Award from the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors (ASHPE), 2007, and the Apex Award for Publication Excellence.
Natural Remedies for Bladder Spasms
Horsetail is one herb that may be useful in strengthening bladder muscles and preventing spasms. Photo Credit herb of horsetail image by Maria Brzostowska from Fotolia.com

Urinary incontinence caused by bladder spasms can strike suddenly and without warning, causing significant embarrassment and discomfort for the sufferer. In a normal bladder, the muscle contracts only upon urination. However, a bladder muscle that is unstable may contract at random times, causing urinary urgency and leakage, reports the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center. Bladder spasms are among the top causes of urinary incontinence in women over the age of 65. Although you should see a doctor to rule out underyling conditions, you may wish to address your bladder spasms through natural remedies and approaches.


According to Wellsphere.com, this mineral is helpful to overall muscle health, and appears to alleviate bladder spasticity. By strengthening the muscles that contract to cause urination, magnesium may prevent random contractions and leakage from occurring. In addition, Wellsphere.com reports that taking magnesium prior to going to bed at night may reduce the occurrence of incontinence during sleep. Although research has yielded some positive results using magnesium for bladder spasms, it is not considered a medical treatment for this condition.

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The Mayo Clinic reports that this ayurvedic herb is one of the more commonly used natural remedies for urinary incontinence. According to "Total Health Magazine," crataeva improves bladder muscle strength and tone, and decreases urinary urgency and frequency. It also improves the flow of urine, which helps in emptying the bladder more completely. When the bladder is emptied efficiently, there is less likelihood of urinary leakage at random times. The Mayo Clinic notes that further research is needed to determine the efficacy of crataeva in addressing urinary incontinence.


Horsetail, also known as equisetum, is another popular natural remedy for bladder spasms and urinary incontinence, the Mayo Clinic notes. Horsetail contains silica, which helps maintain collagen and acts as a urinary astringent and reduces muscle spasms. Its activity as an antispasmodic agent makes this herb useful in reducing urinary leakage and involuntary muscle contractions. Although the Mayo Clinic specifies that alternative treatments such as horsetail are not considered cures for urinary incontinence, it adds that these remedies may provide some degree of relief.

Kegel Exercises

Another natural remedy for improving bladder function is the use of kegel exercises. According to Medline Plus, these exercises strengthen the pelvic floor muscles, which in turn improves the strength of the urethral sphincter. These exercises can be done independently or through the use of a vaginal cone, which is a weighted device that is placed in the vagina. The weight of the cone causes the vaginal muscles to involuntarily contract in order to hold it in place. These contractions, if held for 15 minutes at a time twice daily, can significantly improve bladder function within four to six weeks, Medline Plus reports. If you are not sure whether you are doing Kegel exercises properly or if your incontinence persists, you should contact your doctor.

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