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The Best Asics Running Shoes for Women

author image B. Maté
B. Maté has been reporting on creative industries since 2007—covering everything from Fashion Week to the latest artist to wow the Parisian art scene. Her experience stems from a marketing background, with more than 12 years of experience consulting fashion-forward entrepreneurs.
The Best Asics Running Shoes for Women
The shape of a woman's foot will determine the best running shoe. Photo Credit running shoes and drink image by Warren Millar from Fotolia.com

When a runner is buying a pair of Asics running shoes, most sales associates will ask how often she runs. The answer will determine the level of stability a runner will require in a shoe: high-level stability is for experienced distance runners, while mid-level stability is for novice runners. Other things that a shopper needs to be aware of are the arch support and "pronation." Pronation describes how the foot rolls when it makes contact with the ground. Whether a runner's feet are "over" or under-pronated determines which running sneaker will best compensate stride and foot support.

Common Pitfalls

It is normal for a person to judge a sneaker by its aesthetics, rather than the fit. But when selecting a running shoe, it is all about comfort. Running trainers are not the type of sneaker that should be broken in with time-- it should be absolutely comfortable upon trying it on. Also, the Asics running shoe tends to be narrow compared to other running sneakers. Wider shoes are available upon request. If a runner has a wider foot, she can request her size in a D width (the normal width size for women is a B).

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Where To Buy

The best place to buy the right pair of Asics running sneakers is at a shop that specializes in running apparel and shoes. There, associates will be able to analyze the runner's foot, including the arch, step and pronation to ascertain which shoe will provide the right level of support. If the runner is already acquainted with a specific Asics model---for example if she already owned and is replacing a running shoe---she can bargain hunt online for a better deal.


A mid-level stability Asics running shoe will cost $100 to $120, depending on the model. Experienced or long-distance runners might require a high-level stability sneaker, which are typically more expensive, about $120 to $140. Though there are cheaper Asics models, these running shoes might not have the cushion, weight or support needed for active runners.

Comparison Shopping

How frequently a woman runs, determines the level of support she will need in a running shoe. Asics makes a range of mid-level stability running shoes, which means that they supply adequate cushion, arch support and weight (which boils down to foot protection). If a runner is running more than two to three miles a week, she might want to invest in a high-level stability running shoe. These trainers provide more weight, protection, cushion and arch support that is necessary for a runner who is running more miles and requires more foot stability.


One of the best accessories for a good pair of running shoes is socks. Running socks come in many colors and styles. But runners should look for a light-weight sock, preferably with a mesh-like structure that can wick, or transport, the sweat away from the skin, and keep the foot dry. A running sock should provide protection, a layer of cushion, and prohibit fungal infections.

Insider Tips

A quick way for a new runner to measure her arch---and thus understand her need for arch support in a running shoe---is to wet her foot and step on a large piece of colored paper. The imprint made will tell her how deep the arch of her foot is. If there is a very deep curve from the ball of her foot to her heel, due to lack of contact between her foot and the paper, then the runner has a deep arch. However if the curve is very shallow, then the runner has a flatter foot. Knowing her arch can help a runner select a sneaker that will best stabilize her foot when running.

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