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How to Calculate a Child's Social Security Disability Benefits

by
author image Joe Stone
Joe Stone is a freelance writer in California who has been writing professionally since 2005. His articles have been published on LIVESTRONG.COM, SFgate.com and Chron.com. He also has experience in background investigations and spent almost two decades in legal practice. Stone received his law degree from Southwestern University School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from California State University, Los Angeles.
How to Calculate a Child's Social Security Disability Benefits
Woman with a pen and a calculator Photo Credit DragonImages/iStock/Getty Images

Disabled and blind children are eligible for Social Security benefits under the Supplemental Security Income program. In order to qualify, the child’s disability must meet the definition of disability established by the Social Security Administration and the income of the child's parents must be within permissible limits. The amount of benefits available depends on the SSI federal benefit rate, any adjustments made to the rate in the state where the child resides, and family income. Although the SSA provides guidelines regarding the available benefits, calculating the monthly benefit amount is complex. Submitting an SSI application is the best way to determine the available benefits.

Step 1

Locate the SSA's current "Deeming Eligibility Chart" to determine the maximum gross monthly income that parents can receive and still have their disabled child qualify for SSI. The SSA website provides a chart that applies in most situations and shows, for example, that a single parent with a gross monthly income of $2,821 may receive SSI benefits for a disabled child.

Step 2

Locate the current federal benefit rate for SSI recipients. This rate is the maximum monthly SSI payment available. The rate is adjusted periodically for cost-of-living increases. In 2010, the federal benefit rate for an individual, which includes a disabled child, is $674.

Step 3

Locate information for the state in which the child resides regarding its policy on supplementing the federal benefit rate for SSI recipients. States that supplement the federal benefit rate in 2010 include California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont, as well as the District of Columbia. For example, in California, the monthly SSI payment for a disabled child in 2010 is $737.40.

Step 4

Deduct from the maximum benefit amount located for the disabled child the portion of the family income and resources that are deemed available for the child's care. This is by far the most complex part of calculating the SSI benefits available to a disabled child because of the number of factors that affect the calculations, including the differing rules among the states that supplement SSI benefits. In general, if one of the child's parents has earned income from working, a portion of this income is likely to be deemed available to the child and therefore reduce the monthly benefit amount.

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