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Carb Count in Oranges

by
author image Anna Aronson
Anna Aronson began working as a journalist in 2000 and spent six years at suburban Chicago newspapers before pursuing freelance work. She enjoys writing about health care topics, in particular obstetrics, pediatrics and nutrition. She received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Eastern Illinois University and is now studying for a Master of Science in medicine degree to become a physician's assistant.
Carb Count in Oranges
Oranges cut and in a bowl ready to be eaten. Photo Credit MarianVejcik/iStock/Getty Images

Oranges often serve as a midday snack and also can be used for juice and in various recipes. Eating a medium-sized orange is equal to one of the recommended daily servings of fruit in the Food Guide Pyramid, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reports. The orange will add 60 calories to your daily diet. As with all fruits, they will also add to your daily carbohydrate intake.

Carbohydrate Content

A medium-sized orange contains 15 g of total carbohydrates, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reports. The total carb content amounts to 5 percent of the recommended daily intake if you eat 2,000 calories a day. The carbohydrates in an orange mostly are in the form of sugars, with 12 g in each piece of fruit. Oranges also have 3 g of dietary fiber, which is equal to 12 percent of the recommended daily intake.

Recommended Carbohydrate Intake

Between 45 percent and 65 percent of your total daily calories should come from carbohydrates, the USDA recommends in its Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Carbs are the main source of energy for your body. The carbohydrates in your diet come in two forms: simple and complex. Simple carbs are sugars such as sucrose, fructose and lactose. Complex carbs are starchy foods that contain at least three sugars. Examples of complex carbs are grains, starchy vegetables and legumes.

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Dietary Fiber

Dietary fiber is a type of carbohydrate that provides you with numerous health benefits. It's most well-known function is to treat constipation and regulate your bowel movements, but healthy intakes also can lower cholesterol levels, control blood sugar levels and promote weight loss, MayoClinic.com reports. Dietary fiber is found in fruits and vegetables as well as whole grains. Recommended daily intake for dietary fiber is 25 g for women and 38 g for men 50 and younger and 21 g for women and 30 g for men 51 and older.

Dietary Sources

Carbohydrates are found in many of the foods you eat every day. In addition to oranges, all fruits and vegetables contain carbs, MedlinePlus reports. Grain products also a good source, particularly whole-grain foods such as whole-grain pasta and brown rice. Milk and other dairy products are another source. Candies also have simple carbs because of their sugar content.

Deficiencies and Excessive Intakes

Most American get an ample supply of carbohydrates in their diet. However, diets that contain too many carbohydrate-rich foods put you at an increased risk for obesity and related health conditions, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Diets that are significantly deficient in carbohydrates can cause malnutrition, MedlinePlus states. In addition, people who do not eat enough carbs may eat excessive amounts of fat to make up for the calorie deficit, and this, too, can cause health problems.

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References

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