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How to Make a Skateboard Rack

by
author image Jack Kaltmann
Jack Kaltmann is a Las Vegas-based writer with more than 25 years of professional experience in corporate communications. He is a published author of several books and feature articles for national publications such as "American Artist" and "Inside Kung-Fu." Kaltmann holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Miami University and is a retired nationally certified personal trainer.
How to Make a Skateboard Rack
A young boy is holding a skateboard. Photo Credit Kane Skennar/Digital Vision/Getty Images

If you own more than one skateboard, making your own storage rack is an economical way to neatly store your boards and keep them off the floor. A basic skateboard rack will be mounted to the wall in your bedroom, garage or storage room with the boards placed horizontally and supported by wooden dowels. While this rack is designed to hold five skateboards, the rack height can be increased or decreased for the number of boards you need to store.

Building Rack Frame

Step 1

Identify the general location where you to mount the rack on the wall. Starting from the ceiling, measure from 4 to 6 feet from the ceiling toward the floor and lightly mark the wall with the pencil. This is the top location of the left vertical support and will vary based on your personal preference. Repeat this step and mark another location 2 feet to the right of your first pencil mark, but at the same height. This will be the location for the top of the right vertical support.

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Step 2

Make the rectangular framework by placing the two 4-foot by 2-inch by 4-inch boards on a level surface with the wide, or 4 -inch, surface making contact with the floor. Lay the two 2-foot by 2-inch by 4-inch boards on top of the 4-foot boards, with 6 inches from the top and the second 6 inches from the bottom. These are the horizontal boards that will be mounted to the wall. Line up the edges of the horizontal boards so they are flush with the edges of the vertical boards.

Step 3

Drill two starter holes with the 3/8-inch drill bit at the top and the bottom of each horizontal board. You will have eight holes when completed.

Step 4

Screw a #8 inch wood screw into each starter hole to secure the horizontal boards to the vertical boards.

Step 5

Flip the rack over so the horizontal boards are on the floor.

Step 6

Mark 8-inch increments down the side of each vertical board starting at the top of the board. You will have six pencil marks on each board, but will only need to use five.

Step 7

Drill a 1-1/2-inch hole into five of the pencil marks on each board using the 1-inch drill bit.

Step 8

Add a generous amount of wood glue in each hole and insert the wooden dowels, making sure they are securely seated.

Step 9

Drill two holes 16 inches apart on each of the horizontal boards using the 3/8 inch drill bit. This is where you will mount the rack to wall.

Mounting Rack to Wall

Step 1

Place the rack against the wall, making sure the tops of the vertical boards are lined up with the pencil makes you made on the wall earlier.

Step 2

Screw one #6 drywall screw through the top left hole in the rack, attaching the rack to the wall. Make sure you are screwing into a wall stud.

Step 3

Use the level to make sure the rack is level and then screw in the second drywall screw through the top right hole. The rack should now be level and be able to support its own weight.

Step 4

Secure the bottom horizontal board to the wall using the remaining two drywall screws.

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References

  • Taunton's Complete Illustrated Guide to Woodworking; Lonnie Bird, Andy Rae, Jeff Jewitt ; 2005
  • Skateboarding: Instruction, Programming and Park Design; Ben Wixon; 2009
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