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Nutrition Information for Goat Cheese

by
author image Virginia Van Vynckt
From 1978 until 1995, Virginia Van Vynckt worked as a writer and editor at The Chicago Sun-Times. She has written extensively about food and nutrition, having co-authored seven cookbooks. She also published "Our Own," a book about older-child adoption. Van Vynckt holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism from Indiana University.
Nutrition Information for Goat Cheese
Sliced beets with goat cheese and walnuts. Photo Credit IrKiev/iStock/Getty Images

Goat cheese, or chèvre, varies nutritionally depending on whether it’s the soft, semi-soft or hard type. Like all cheeses, cheese made from goat’s milk is high in fat and supplies protein, calcium and vitamin A.

Soft Goat Cheese

Much of the goat cheese produced and sold in the United States is the soft kind, often rolled into small logs. One ounce, or 28.35 grams, has 76 calories, 5 grams of protein, 6 grams of fat including 4 grams of saturated fat, 130 milligrams of sodium and 13 milligrams of cholesterol. It supplies about 4 percent of the FDA's recommended daily value for calcium and almost 6 percent for vitamin A, based on a 2,000-calorie diet.

Semi-Soft Goat Cheese

One ounce, or 28.35 grams, of semi-soft goat cheese has 103 calories, 6 grams protein, 8.5 grams of fat including 6 grams of saturated fat, 118 milligrams of sodium and 22 milligrams of cholesterol. It yields about 8 percent of the daily value for calcium and 8 percent for vitamin A, based on a 2,000-calorie diet.

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Hard Goat Cheese

One ounce, or 28.35 grams, of hard goat cheese averages 128 calories, 8.7 grams of protein,10 grams of fat including 7 grams of saturated fat, 120 milligrams of sodium and 30 milligrams of cholesterol. It provides 25 percent of the DV for calcium and 10 percent of the DV for vitamin A, based on a 2,000-calorie diet.

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