• You're all caught up!

Tired Baggy Eyes

author image Erica Roth
Erica Roth has been a writer since 2007. She is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists and was a college reference librarian for eight years. Roth earned a Bachelor of Arts in French literature from Brandeis University and Master of Library Science from Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science. Her articles appear on various websites.
Tired Baggy Eyes
A young businessman has tired eyes. Photo Credit Rostislav_Sedlacek/iStock/Getty Images

Tired, baggy eyes can make you look older, no matter what your age. Sagging skin under your eyes, around the corners and on your eyelids contributes to a tired look. The condition can be temporary or chronic based on factors such as stress, lack of sleep and genes. Speak to your doctor about your eye bags before taking matters into your own hands.

An Eye on Symptoms

You will not necessarily experience all of the symptoms of tired, baggy eyes at once, but may notice different signs at one time or another. You may have dark circles under your eyes, minor puffiness or swelling, and noticeable sagging of the skin both underneath your eyes and around your upper eyelids. Itching and redness may accompany the swelling in some cases.

What's Behind the Bagginess

Tired, baggy eyes can be caused by lack of sleep, of course. Fluid retention is another reason for puffiness and a lethargic look to your eyes in the morning. You might also have dark circles under your eyes if you have seasonal allergies. Finally, genetics plays a role in tired, baggy eyes. Drooping skin is a normal part of aging, and some people are more prone to this than others.

Try These at Home

You can perk up your tired-looking eyes with a series of home remedies. Cutting back on sodium may help, because sodium makes your body retain extra fluid. Reduce fluid retention further with your sleep position -- instead of sleeping flat on your back, raise your head up a bit by physically raising the head of your bed or sleeping in a reclining chair. This position helps fluids drain from your face, so in the morning your eyes won't look as baggy or tired. Get enough rest as another noninvasive remedy for tired eyes. When you have had a full night's rest, your entire body will feel refreshed and less droopy. You might try tightening the skin around your eyes with an anti-aging product that contains alpha-lipoic acid, or ALA. The results of anti-aging products vary, so spot-test creams or lotions before applying them to your eye area to rule out allergies.

Surgical Solutions

Cosmetic surgery can be a solution for tired, baggy eyes that do not respond to lifestyle modifications. Eyelid surgery of this kind is called blepharoplasty, and removes excess skin from your eyelids. The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery explains that this type of surgery causes temporary swelling and bruising in the eye area, which can be controlled through the application of cold compresses.

The Big Picture

Tired, baggy eyes may make you self-conscious about your appearance, but in most cases, they do not interfere with your health. Medical insurance does not cover eyelid surgery unless the procedure is deemed medically necessary, such as if your eyelid are drooping so far down that they limit your vision. Consult your doctor about alternative solutions for your tired, baggy eyes if at-home remedies are not improving your appearance.

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
  • Female
  • Male
ft. in.



Demand Media