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A Comparison of Camping Hammocks

by
author image Dale Koppel
Dale Koppel has been writing since 1987 and is author of "The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Online Dating." Her work has appeared in the "Boston Globe," "Miami Herald," "Los Angeles Times" and "Redbook." Koppel has a B.S. in journalism from Boston University, an M.A. in educational psychology from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in curriculum/instruction from University of New Mexico.
A Comparison of Camping Hammocks
Camping hammock in context. Photo Credit aoldman/iStock/Getty Images

Hammocks for camping are becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to tents. Designed specifically for camping, camping hammocks offer features that tents can't offer, including ease of transport. A lightweight camping hammock, with the requisite accessories, is less than half the weight of a tent. It provides better back support and reduces typical hikers' foot swelling because your feet are higher than your torso. And all you need are two trees to create a campsite.

Hennessy Hammocks

Every Hennessy Hammock includes attached mosquito netting, a detachable rain fly, support ropes and tree huggers that protect the tree bark. Some hammocks are specifically designed for winter camping and for camping in the jungle. All of them can be folded into chairs or loungers. As of 2010, prices start at around $100.

Clark Jungle Hammocks

The six Clark Jungle Hammock models have a built-in stuff bag and a no-tip design. The full mosquito netting has zippered entry and exit on two sides making it easy to get in and out. There's a detachable rain fly and up to six pockets for gear, including boots. As of 2010, prices start at $240. The Vertex, a two-person, three-season model with independent stability for each person, is about $540.

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Speer Hammocks

Speer Hammocks start at $100, as of 2010, and weigh as little as 22 oz. A 6-inch by 10-inch stuff bag holds hammock, bug net and an 8-foot by 10-foot tarp. Because the tarp is not attached, you can place it high or low, depending on your preference and weather conditions. The removable bug net is attached with hook and loop fasteners that open from either side.

ENO Camping Hammocks

ENO camping hammocks range from about $54 to $85, as of 2010, depending on your choice of the DoubleNest, the SingleNest or the ProNest models. Adding the suspension system brings the price up $20 to $25. Rain tarps range from about $80 to $150, and bug netting is an additional $55. Sacks range from about $50 to $60. ENO provides a two-year warranty on its hammocks.

Hammock Bliss

Hammock Bliss makes the Hammock Bliss Triple, the largest portable hammock in the world. It's 8 foot by 2 inches by 9 foot by 10 inches and, as of 2010, sells for about $75. It weighs 26 oz. At 4 foot by 6 inches by 7 feet by 11 inches, the Ultralight model is 13 oz. and costs about $40. Accessories include tree straps and netting that seals off the hammock. The No-See-Um-No-More Hammock Bliss includes netting.

Considerations

With so many camping hammocks on the market, it is possible to choose the hammock that meets your camping needs as well as your budget. It's important to consider the type of camping you do, the type of body you have, and the climate conditions before you make your final decision. You may even consider buying a couple of different hammocks, including one built for two people.

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