zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

How To Take Slippery Elm Bark Powder

by
author image Leigh Wittman
Leigh Wittman has been writing professionally since 2007. She writes primarily on health, career advice, outdoor pursuits and travel for various websites. Wittman is a licensed nurse and studied nursing at Arizona State University.
How To Take Slippery Elm Bark Powder
slippery elm bark shown on plate Photo Credit Hakat/iStock/Getty Images

Slippery elm bark is an herb that was originally used by Native Americans to treat symptoms associated with gastrointestinal upset, cough and sore throat, according to "Prescription for Natural Cures." In the 21st century, powdered slippery elm bark is used to make a tea to calm upset stomach and sooth sore throats. Never use an herbal remedy as a substitute for doctor's care. Visit your physician to determine if slippery elm bark is suitable for your needs.

Step 1

Fill a teapot with 12 oz. water. Place the teapot on the stove top, or plug it in if it is an electric teapot, and bring the water to a boil.

Step 2

Add 2 tbsp. slippery elm bark powder, which "Making Plant Medicine" advises can be purchased at many health food stores, to the mug.

Step 3

Pour the boiling water into the mug. Allow the slippery elm bark to steep in the water for three minutes.

You Might Also Like

Step 4

Stir the tea with a spoon for one minute, then allow the slippery elm bark to steep for another minute.

Step 5

Sip the tea when the temperature cools to a comfortable point, which typically requires one to two minutes.

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

References

  • “Prescription for Natural Cures”; James Balch and Mark Stengler; 2004
  • "Making Plant Medicine"; Richo Cech, Sena K. Cech, and Anne Gunter; 2000
  • “Alternative Cures: More than 1,000 of the Most Effective Natural Home Remedies”; Bill Gottlieb; 2008
Demand Media