zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

The Best Exercise If You Have Arotic Heart Disease

by
author image James Roland
James Roland started writing professionally in 1987. A former reporter and editor with the "Sarasota Herald-Tribune," he currently oversees such publications as the "Cleveland Clinic Heart Advisor" and UCLA's "Healthy Years." Roland earned his Bachelor of Science in journalism from the University of Oregon.
The Best Exercise If You Have Arotic Heart Disease
The treadmill can be an effective form of exercise for sufferers of aortic heart disease. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

Aortic heart disease is a condition affecting the aortic valve, one of four valves in the heart. Most aortic valve problems are related to stenosis, when the valve becomes rigid an unable to open properly, or regurgitation, when the valve leaflets are loose and do not close properly. Both problems can put a strain on the heart, which makes safe and appropriate exercise an important aspect of treatment.

Features

If you have mild aortic stenosis but have no symptoms, such as a noticeable decrease in your ability to exercise, you and your physician should monitor your condition annually or as your doctor recommends. More severe aortic stenosis should be treated with valve replacement , as no medications are known to be effective. Aortic valve regurgitation, however, can be treated with medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. If you have aortic valve regurgitation, you may not need valve repair or replacement unless the condition causes your left ventricle to expand and become unable to pump blood effectively throughout the body.

Exercise Treatment

Strengthening your cardiovascular system is important regardless of any medical conditions you have, but it's particularly important if you've developed or you were born with some form of heart disease. A sedentary lifestyle will diminish the heart's pumping efficiency. Cedars-Sinai notes that exercise is particularly important in managing aortic heart disease and that "power walks" or brisk walking sessions of 15 to 30 minutes, two or three times a day are strongly recommended.

Warnings

While a brisk walk may help strengthen the heart's pumping ability, other forms of exercise can be risky. Cedars-Sinai, for example, warns against lifting heavy objects because the added strain on the heart. The Texas Heart Institute also suggests that you not exercise too hard if you have aortic stenosis. Fainting and chest pain can accompany strong exertion.

Considerations

Exercise won't reverse aortic valve disease, but it can help lower your blood pressure and strengthen your heart to make recovery from surgery easier, CNN reports. Exercise can also help you lose weight, which will further reduce the burden on your heart. It's important to follow your doctor's advice closely and report any change in your condition, such as reduced exercise tolerance, chest pain or difficulty lying flat, which is a sign that your aortic hear disease is worsening.

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
Lose Weight. Feel Great Change your life with MyPlate by LIVESTRONG.COM
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

CURRENTLY TRENDING

Demand Media

Our Privacy Policy has been updated. Please take a moment and read it here.