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Foods That Don't Effect Gout

by
author image Laurel Heidtman
Laurel Heidtman began writing for her hometown paper, "The Harrison Press," in 1964. In addition to freelancing she has worked as a police officer, a registered nurse, a health educator and a technical writer. She holds an associate degree in nursing, a Bachelor of Arts in English and a Master of Technical and Scientific Communication from Miami University of Ohio.
Foods That Don't Effect Gout
Peanut butter, fruit and grains are safe to eat if you have gout. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

Overview

Purines are substances present in most foods. When your body metabolizes purines during digestion, it forms a waste product called uric acid. Usually the kidneys can eliminate uric acid without difficulty, but in some people, the body makes too much or the kidneys eliminate too little. The excess uric acid crystallizes and becomes deposited in joints, resulting in a form of arthritis called gout. Some risk factors for gout, such as genetics, are out of your control, but you can manage the level of purines in your body by eating foods low in purines.

Nuts

Foods That Don't Effect Gout
Bag of peanuts and jar of peanut butter Photo Credit HandmadePictures/iStock/Getty Images

Because all nuts are low in purines, the Arthritis Foundation indicates that you need not restrict them in a gout diet. Nuts and nut butters are also a good source of protein. Because all meats and fish contain high or moderate amounts of protein, use nuts or nut butters to replace some of the animal protein in your diet. Dietary recommendations for the meat and beans food group are 5 to 6 ounces daily for adults. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter is the equivalent of a 1-ounce serving from this food group, and half an ounce of nuts or seeds is equivalent to a 1-ounce serving.

Fruits and Vegetables

Foods That Don't Effect Gout
Gardener holding box of vegetables Photo Credit gpointstudio/iStock/Getty Images

New York University Langone Medical Center advises that all fruit and fruit juices are safe for you to drink if you have gout because they are low in purines. Most vegetables are also low in purines, but moderate amounts are found in mushrooms, green and dried peas, dried beans, asparagus, cauliflower and spinach. If you already have gout, you may need to limit these foods; however, the "Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide" reports that a high intake of purine-rich vegetables does not increase the risk of developing gout.

Grains

Foods That Don't Effect Gout
Spaghetti with tomato sauce Photo Credit beti gorse/iStock/Getty Images

All grain products, including pasta, rice and breads, are safe to eat if you have gout. NYU Langone Medical Center does recommend limiting oatmeal to no more than two-thirds of a cup uncooked cereal daily, however. The Arthritis Foundation goes further in saying that whole grain cereals contain moderate amounts of purine, whereas refined ones are low in purine.

Eggs and Dairy

Foods That Don't Effect Gout
An assortment of dairy products Photo Credit Oksana Shufrich/iStock/Getty Images

Eggs, milk, cheese and yogurt are safe to eat if you have gout. To control your weight, you should consume only nonfat or low-fat dairy products. A study cited in the "Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide" found that men who consumed more dairy products had a lower risk of developing gout than did those who consumed very little. Eggs and dairy products are also good sources of protein. Substituting them for meat and fish that contain high amounts of purine is another way to lower overall purine consumption.

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