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What Are the Health Benefits of Beeswax?

author image Jonathan Croswell
Jonathan Croswell has spent more than five years writing and editing for a number of newspapers and online publications, including the "Omaha World-Herald" and "New York Newsday." Croswell received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Nebraska and is currently pursuing a Master's of Health and Exercise Science at Portland State University.
What Are the Health Benefits of Beeswax?
Beeswax offers several benefits to your body, particularly as a topical treatment. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/BananaStock/Getty Images

Beeswax can be confused with bee pollen and honey; all are produced by bees and are similar in their structure. However, beeswax is a unique substance and has several benefits to the human body. Beeswax has no benefit when consumed directly because it is inert, but it can have other applications that are beneficial to your body.


Beeswax is produced from glands in the abdomens of bees. The wax is produced by young bees and then scraped off their bodies, chewed and mixed with bee saliva as well as other enzymes. After the bee chews and processes the wax, it attaches it to the honeycomb, where pollen is stored and bees reside. The wax also helps safely store honey produced by the bees, and it can help protect the hive from infections and other unwanted contaminants.


Beeswax has non-allergenic properties that can make it a useful skin protection from various airborne allergies. It can also help slow down the dispersal of medications into the body. According to North Carolina State University, it is a good electric insulator. Beeswax also provides slight anti-inflammatory and antioxidant qualities which can benefit the body.

Topical Uses

Beeswax contains natural moisturizers that make it useful as a skin and lip balm -- the substance locks in moisture and can help keep the skin firm and plump. In some cases, beeswax may be applied to minor burns or other skin damage in order to help the skin heal. According to the Bastyr Center for Natural Health, beeswax can also be mixed with other products, such as honey and olive oil, to produce lotions and balms that can serve as natural treatments against eczema and psoriasis.

Food Uses

Although beeswax does not have a direct effect on its own in the human body, it is used in food processing to your body's benefit. According to North Carolina State University, beeswax is used in the processing, packaging and preservation of some foods. It can guard against the effects of acids in foods, including honey, helping to keep foods healthy and safe for consumption.

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