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How to Wear a Truss for an Abdominal Hernia

by
author image Julia Michelle
Julia Michelle has been writing professionally since January 2009. Her specialties include massage therapy, computer tech support, land and aquatic personal training, aquatic group fitness and Reiki. She has an Associate in Applied Science from Cincinnati State Technical and Community College in integrative medical massage therapy.
How to Wear a Truss for an Abdominal Hernia
A close-up of a man holding his lower back as if in pain. Photo Credit chingyunsong/iStock/Getty Images

A hernia is caused by part an internal organ pushing through a weak area of muscle. Inguinal, or groin, hernias are the most common, according to MedlinePlus, but hernias can also occur in the abdominal wall. A physician can surgically correct the weak area of muscle, and may recommend that you wear a truss before or after surgery. A truss uses pads to compress the abdomen, and pushes the section of organ back into place. Trusses come in several styles, including step-in underwear-type garments with straps, and belts that wrap around the abdomen.

Step 1

Step into the underwear-style truss and pull it up over your hips. For belts, wrap the belt around your abdomen in the area of the hernia.

Step 2

Insert the hernia pad into the truss, directly over the hernia. Insert a second pad if you have hernias on both sides.

Step 3

Gently press the pads to push the hernias back into the abdominal cavity. Secure the straps, or tighten the belt, to hold the pads in place and maintain compression on the hernia.

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