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The Best Drinks While on a Diet

by
author image Brian East Dean
Brian East Dean is a registered dietitian who has been writing since 2007 on all things nutrition and health. His work has appeared in top health portals around the Web, such as Metabolism.com, and in the academic publication "Nutrition Today." He holds a Master of Science in nutrition from Tufts University in Boston.
The Best Drinks While on a Diet
Drinking green tea can increase metabolism during dieting. Photo Credit Green tea image by huaxiadragon from Fotolia.com

Eating a reduced-calorie diet can only help your weight-loss efforts so much if you drink calorie-rich drinks like soda and whole milk while dieting, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. Including weight-friendly beverages in your low-calorie diet can help you drop those extra pounds.

Green Tea

Green tea contains antioxidants called polyphenols. The antioxidant compound called EGCG boosts metabolism and fat burning, says Kristel Diepvens of Maastricht University. In research in the May 2005 "British Journal of Nutrition," Diepvens found that drinking green tea prevented the slowing of metabolism that often accompanies reducing calories. Additionally, green tea allows you to exercise intensely for longer periods of time -- burning more calories and body fat -- .reports the "American Journal of Physiology." A cup of green tea contains about 50 to 150 milligrams of polyphenols. For adult consumption, the University of Maryland Medical Center recommends 240 to 320 milligrams of polyphenols per day -- available in 2 to 3 cups of green tea depending on the brand. Green tea contains zero calories. If you sweeten your tea with honey, the calorie count goes up to 22 per teaspoon or 68 calories per tablespoon.

The UMMC recommends that you avoid green tea if you have medical issues including heart problems, high blood pressure, kidney or liver problems, stomach ulcers or suffer from anxiety. For other health problems, consult your physician before consuming green tea.

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Water

Water contains no calories, fat or sugar and makes a healthy, diet-friendly alternative to sugary soft drinks. Additionally, consuming two 8 oz. glasses of water before meals suppresses appetite so that you eat less at mealtime, Science Daily says. Water fills and distends your stomach, inducing feelings of fullness.

Skim Milk

Drinking skim milk and kefir -- two calcium-rich dairy products -- can accelerate the weight you lose from dieting, states the University of Tennessee's M.B. Zemel. In research in the May 2005 "Obesity Research," a group of overweight volunteers ate a low-calorie eating plan that included three dairy servings per day and another group ate the same plan without dairy. The dairy-consuming group lost twice the amount of fat and body weight. Zemel states that vitamin D and calcium, found in abundance in dairy products, activates your body's fat-burning enzymes. With its 80 calories, a cup of skim milk makes a healthy low-calorie beverage..

Red Wine

Red wine contains the health-promoting antioxidant resveratrol. Drinking moderate amounts of red wine can offset weight gain when you overeat, Science Daily states. An animal study presented at the the Endocrine Society's 90th Annual Meeting found that red wine-derived resveratrol offset weight gain in lab animals eating a calorie-rich diet. No human studies exist to date. Ensure that you don't consume more than one glass for women and two glasses for men. Drinking more than this amount can contribute to weight gain. Red wine contains 80 calories in a 4-ounce glass and 160 calories in an 8-ounce glass.

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