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Are There Foods That Get Rid of Back Fat?

author image Jon Williams
Jon Williams is a clinical psychologist and freelance writer. He has performed, presented and published research on a variety of psychological and physical health issues.
Are There Foods That Get Rid of Back Fat?
Certain foods can help you lose back fat. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

Backs are beautiful, but most would agree that back fat detracts from their natural allure. You grow back fat when your calorie intake exceeds your calorie expenditure. Certain foods alter the balance of calorie intake and expenditure, by reducing the number of calories you take in or by increasing the number of calories you burn. Foods reduce back fat through several mechanisms, including providing low calories sustenance, decreasing your appetite, blocking fat and increasing your metabolism.

Reduce All Fat

Foods that reduce back fat, in fact, reduce fat from all over your body. While your genes determine where your fat cells tend to congregate, says Barry Star, M.D. from the Stanford School of Medicine, the process that selects where fat is drawn when you need energy is more egalitarian. When blood glucose gets low, your pancreas releases a hormone, glucagon, into your bloodstream. Glucagon, with the help of some enzymes, is diffused throughout your body, tapping free fatty acids from wherever fat is stored. So, foods don't help you target back fat, but simply assist in the reduction of fat from all over your body.

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Greens And Vegetables

Salad greens, cooking greens and vegetables fill you up with low-calorie food that is packed with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. Eating salads takes time and requires lots of chewing, helping to sate your appetitive drive. The fiber in greens and vegetables slows your digestion, prolonging the release of glucose into your bloodstream, which helps to curb your post-meal cravings. For the most part, greens and vegetables have low calorie counts, so these foods fill you up without adding to your calorie load. To reduce your overall caloric intake while still satisfying your hunger, fill at least half your plate with vegetables, recommends the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Other High-Fiber Foods

Oats, whole grain bread, brown rice and legumes are filled with fiber that slows digestion and curbs your appetite. The fiber in these foods contributes bulk and scrubs your intestines to enhance digestion, but your body can't absorb it so it does not contribute calories. Water soluble fiber, such as found in oats, binds with and helps prevent absorption of fat.

Lean Meats

Protein is necessary for many body functions. High-protein foods, such as meats and dairy, maintain your muscle mass and contribute raw building material for the synthesis of neurotransmitters that regulate attentional and energy processes in your brain. High-protein foods require more energy to digest, so about 30 percent of the calories they contain are burned in the process of breaking them down. Lean meats that include skinless turkey and chicken breasts slow digestion and reduce cravings.


Apples contain the fiber pectin, which binds with fat and reduces how much you absorb. Eat an apple 30 minutes before a meal to dull your appetite and create a digestive greeting committee that will escort some of your dietary fat out of your system.

Green Tea

Green tea contains antioxidants called catechins that increase your metabolism, causing you to burn more calories. A 2008 study published in "Physiology and Behavior" concluded that green tea helped reduce weight in obese subjects by increasing fat oxidation and calorie expenditure.

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