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Do Resistance Kinetic Bands Help You Run Faster?

by
author image Stacy Armada
Stacy Armada began writing in 2011. Her past athletic accomplishments and passion for exercise led her to pursue a career in health and fitness. She received a B.S. in kinesiology with a concentration in exercise science from California State University, San Bernardino. Armada is a certified personal trainer through the NASM.
Do Resistance Kinetic Bands Help You Run Faster?
Sprinter on the track Photo Credit Jacob Ammentorp Lund/iStock/Getty Images

Resistance kinetic bands, also know as KBands, can provide you with an additional tool to help you excel at your run. Instead of training harder, train smarter. Kinetic bands can help you run faster by increasing muscular strength and flexibility. The bands create tension in every motion of an exercise. To accomplish this, your movements should be controlled in both directions. These bands will strengthen the muscles in your lower body to help you become faster, quicker and stronger.

Reverse Lunge

Reverse lunges strengthen your butt (gluteus maximus) and quadriceps. Performing the lunge in reverse also takes some of the pressure off of your knees and puts more focus on your muscles. To begin, strap one side of the resistance kinetic band securely around your left thigh and the other around your right thigh halfway between your knees and hip. Stand with your feet hip-width apart. Start with your right leg behind you and bend both knees to lower into a lunge. Aim for a 90-degree angle behind your knees. Then step forward so that both feet are together. This equals one repetition. Perform 12 to 15 reps with your right leg stepping back; then switch legs. Perform three sets of 12 to 15 repetitions on each side.

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Step Ups Into Knee Raise

Runners often complain about tight hips after a run. This exercise is a great way to create strength and flexibility in your hips. As described above, strap the kinetic band securely around your thighs halfway between your knee and hip. Stand directly in front of a step (riser or bench) that is about knee height, and place your left foot firmly onto the step. Press down with your left heel and push your body up until your left leg is straight. Next, bring your right knee up to your chest, or hip height, depending upon your flexibility. Slowly lower your right foot back to the floor to the start position. That’s one rep. Do 15 reps with your left leg staying on the step, then repeat on your right leg. Perform two to three sets.

Single Leg Side Jumps

Strap the kinetic band around your mid-thighs and start by standing on your left leg. Jump as far as you can to your right and and land on your right leg. Squat down with your right leg and jump to your left, landing back on your left leg. At this point you will be back at the start position. That’s one repetition. Perform 30 reps without taking a break, and aim for two to three sets. This is a great exercise to help increase your endurance.

Walking Grand Plie Side Squats

With the KBand once again strapped to your mid-thighs, stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Your toes should be slightly turned out and your arms relaxed at your sides. At this point, lower your body with your knees and bend into a low squat. You will want your thighs to be parallel to the ground. Stand straight up and bring your feet together. Then side step to your left, and repeat. Complete 15 to 20 reps moving to your left and then perform 15 to 20 reps to your right side. Work up to three sets. If you are new to exercising, start with as many as you can and gradually increase your workout duration and intensity.

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