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Is Jumping Rope a Good Cardio Workout?

author image Eleanor McKenzie
Based in London, Eleanor McKenzie has been writing lifestyle-related books and articles since 1998. Her articles have appeared in the "Palm Beach Times" and she is the author of numerous books published by Hamlyn U.K., including "Healing Reiki" and "Pilates System." She holds a Master of Arts in informational studies from London University.
Is Jumping Rope a Good Cardio Workout?
A woman jumping rope outside Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Goodshoot/Getty Images

Jumping rope comes highly recommended as a cardiovascular exercise by the U.S. Olympic Committee and the American College of Sports Medicine. But you don't have to be an Olympic athlete to gain the benefits.

Less Dangerous Than Jogging

According to the U.S. Olympic Committee jumping rope causes fewer muscle or bone injuries than jogging and provides a fast track to fitness. The American College of Sports Medicine also recommends it for aerobic conditioning. To improve your heart and lung health, ACSM recommends jumping rope for three to five times weekly for sessions lasting from 20 to 60 minutes, depending on your level of fitness. These sessions can be continuous exercise, or you can break them into 10-minute workouts.

Take Your Pulse

Check your pulse rate at the beginning and after sessions to see how this exercise strengthens your heart. To find the pulse rate you should be aiming for, subtract your age from 220 and multiply by 0.9 and 0.6. This gives you a high and low range. For example, a 25-year-old needs to raise the pulse rate to the range 117 to 176 during exercise to improve their aerobic conditioning.

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