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Iron Gym Chin-Up Bar Injuries

author image Jenna Morris
Jenna Morris began writing in 2010 for various websites. She holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in graphic design from Columbia College Chicago and in 2007 she became a certified yoga instructor and NASM-certified personal trainer.
Iron Gym Chin-Up Bar Injuries
Your door frame could become your next gym. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

Iron Gym, a device made for at-home workout use, is supposed to be easy to install and easy to use. The apparatus attaches to your door frame, yet not all door frames are created equal. According to an article on KVFS.com, a news station in Missouri, your door frame must be between 24 and 32 inches wide. Attaching the Iron Gym to the wrong foundation could result in the product slipping, and ultimately result in injury. Aside from assembly and set up, the Iron Gym is pretty straight forward. But if you use this bar for pullups and chinups, be sure you have proper form to avoid injury.

About Iron Gym

The Iron Gym is made of steel, supports up to 300 pounds, and can be used for pullups, pushups, chinups, dips, and situps. The Iron Gym is sent to you in pieces and should take between 10 to 20 minutes to assemble. Once assembled, however, you must hook it on your door frame. Since trim width and door widths can vary, the Iron Gym may not work in every door. Door trim or molding cannot exceed three and a half inches. To secure the Iron Gym, you hook it on the top part of the outside of your door frame. No anchors or screws are required, so your door will not get marked.


The real risk of injury lies in your door frame. Attempting to use the Iron Gym on a door that's not wide enough or does not have the right trim will cause the bar to slide off. You could jump into your first pullup, only to have the bar detach and send you and your Iron Gym to a heap on the floor. It is also important to note that the Iron Gym will most likely not be at a height that allows your arms and legs to extend while doing pull-ups or chin-ups, since the top of most door frames can be easily reached when standing. Be sure to keep your knees bent.

Proper Form

Injury may also occur by performing exercises with improper form and technique. Stronglifts.com recommends starting your pullups with a shoulder-width overhand grip, arms fully extended. Breathe in at the bottom and as you exhale, begin to pull yourself up to the bar. Keep your eyes on the bar and lead with your chest so your shoulders to not dip forward, placing unnecessary strain on them. As your elbows drive down to the floor, pull your chin up past the bar. For proper chinup technique, also begin with straight arms, but this time with an underhand grip. Follow the same points of pulling your chest toward the bar, elbows toward the ground, and keeping your shoulders back.


Avoiding injury with your Iron Gym should be relatively simple if you have the device properly set up and are performing the exercises with proper technique. For further injury prevention, indoorclimbing.com recommends a 15-minute warm up session prior to jumping into your chinups or pullups. Start with five minutes of heart-pumping cardio like jumping jacks, jogging, or kettlebell swings, and follow that with 10 minutes of some dynamic stretching for your shoulders and neck.

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