zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

The Best Pilates Workout Online

by
author image Lisa Mercer
In 1999, Lisa Mercer’s fitness, travel and skiing expertise inspired a writing career. Her books include "Open Your Heart with Winter Fitness" and "101 Women's Fitness Tips." Her articles have appeared in "Aspen Magazine," "HerSports," "32 Degrees," "Pregnancy Magazine" and "Wired." Mercer has a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the City College of New York.
The Best Pilates Workout Online
Woman in workout gear on laptop Photo Credit JackF/iStock/Getty Images

Effective Pilates workouts require a certified instructor's discerning eye. But when life's commitments interfere with your ability to get to the studio, online Pilates workouts may offer an acceptable alternative. Hundreds of pictorial, animated and video Pilates workouts populate the Internet -- but only some provide accurate, effective instruction.

Selecting a Workout

Check the creator's credentials before you select an online Pilates workout. Choose websites designed by certified instructors from respected organizations. Your personal learning style also determines the best type of site for your purposes. If you learn best with verbal instructions, choose websites that offer online videos or podcasts. Physical learners, who learn best by experimenting with different ways of performing a movement, do well with photos or animations, which give them time to "play" with the movement before proceeding to the next exercise.

Warm-ups and Pre-Pilates

Joseph Pilates usually worked with professional athletes and dancers. When the technique hit mainstream fitness centers in the 1990s, the general population found it difficult to perform some of the exercises. The Pilates warm-up, also called pre-Pilates exercise concept, evolved in the late 20th century. These exercises help you find the postural alignment necessary for effective Pilates exercise performance. Moira Stott, who created the Stott Pilates method, features 16 warmup and pre-Pilates exercises on the Stott Pilates website. The website features photos with short but precise instructions.

Pilates Equipment

Balanced Body, a Pilates equipment manufacturer, also sponsors Balanced Body University, an educational program for Pilates instructors. The Balanced Body University website features podcasts of different types of Pilates equipment. Choose between podcasts geared toward Pilates enthusiasts, instructors, rehabilitation specialists and athletes. The podcast lineup stars certified, well-known Pilates instructors, who often present at fitness industry conferences. Equipment includes the reformer, the chair, the barrel, the fitness circle and the arc. A few of the podcasts demonstrate stability ball and foam roller Pilates exercises.

Balance Equipment

Twin sisters and certified Pilates instructors Katherine and Kimberly Corp own Pilates on Fifth in New York City. The former Rockettes developed a series of highly innovative Pilates exercises, performed on balance equipment such as the stability ball, the bosu, which is a half-ball, as well as exercises performed with resistance bands and medicine balls. One sister instructs the exercise, while the other demonstrates. Instructions are clear and precise, and form is meticulous. Both women are tall, slim and have long limbs, making it easy to see what muscles they use. The sisters frequently add new exercises.

Band Exercise

If you can not afford Pilates equipment sessions, certain types of resistance bands and tubes offer a viable alternative. These tubes attach to a door jamb, and feature separate attachments for your hands and feet. The LiveExercise.com website has an online channel that features home Pilates exercises using this type of tubing device. They offer three free, weekly workouts, but archive each of the sessions. A fast and free registration process provides access to all of the exercise videos. Certified instructor and Florida studio owner Shannon Lents leads the workouts.

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

CURRENTLY TRENDING

Demand Media

Our Privacy Policy has been updated. Please take a moment and read it here.