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Weight Training Exercises to Avoid With a Bad Neck

by
author image Rashelle Brown
Rashelle Brown has been writing since 2003, primarily covering topics on health, fitness and nutrition. She is an ACE certified personal trainer and health coach, and the author of MNFitnessBlogger.com. She is an occasional contributor to "IDEA Fitness Journal" and is currently working on a weight loss book.
Weight Training Exercises to Avoid With a Bad Neck
A woman is doing lateral pull downs. Photo Credit Monkey Business Images/Monkey Business/Getty Images

If you suffer from neck pain, there are a few exercises you'll definitely want to avoid. In addition to the short list of weight-training moves you should never do, there are also warm-up exercises, cool-down stretches and form modifications to other exercises that also present risks. You might be surprised to find that doing a few exercises that specifically target the neck muscles is actually a good idea, as long as you don't suffer from a serious biomechanical deficiency.

Stop Doing These Four Exercises

There are four exercises, or specific versions of exercises, actually, that you should never do if you have a bad neck. The first is situps or crunches with your hands laced behind your head. This move places a ton of strain on the discs between the vertebrae in your neck and can cause disc herniation. The second exercise to skip is the lat pulldown with the bar behind your neck. Bending the head forward during this move causes excessive flexion in the cervical vertebrae. The same is true of the military press, with the bar dipping behind the head. Finally, you should avoid such extreme exercises as the front and rear neck bridge, which place tremendous amounts of pressure on the cervical spine.

Watch Out During Warm-Up and Cool-Down

The warm-up and cool-down are an important part of a weight-training workout, and while it's important to include neck exercises, there are a couple of high-risk movements you should avoid. First is the full neck roll, often done during warm-up, which moves your head in a circular pattern. This motion can compress the nerves in your neck and cause damage to the discs there. During the cool-down, you should never stretch the neck by pressing the hand against your head. Instead, slowly and gently move your head from side to side, holding for about five seconds in each position.

Avoid These Other Exercise Mistakes

Not only are certain exercises not recommended if you have a bad neck, but specific ways of exercising should be avoided in order to reduce the risk of injury. Failing to warm up before weight training, moving too quickly through your workout, and performing the same exercises week in and week out should all be avoided. Using safe equipment and proper form are essential to safety, and it's also very important to progress slowly with weight training. Training volume -- weight lifted and/or number of repetitions performed -- should only be increased by 5 to 10 percent when you feel ready to progress.

Some Good Alternative Exercises

Even with a bad neck, there are ways to safely work every muscle group. Modify situps by performing crunches with your hands tucked under your lumbar spine. Work your lats and shoulders by performing lat pulldowns and military barbell presses with the bar coming down in front of your chin rather than behind your head. You can even perform safe exercises to strengthen the neck muscles by performing front/back and lateral neck flexion against gentle resistance. Place your palm flat against the back of your head, forehead or side of the head. Slowly and gently push against your hand with your neck -- not moving your hand, but your neck only. Hold for five to 10 seconds for each repetition.

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