zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

What Is a Good Bench Press for a Sophomore Football Player?

by
author image Bobby R. Goldsmith
Bobby R. Goldsmith is a writer and editor with over 12 years of experience in journalism, marketing and academics. His work has been published by the Santa Fe Writers Project, "DASH Literary Journal," the "Inland Valley Daily Bulletin" and WiseGEEK.
What Is a Good Bench Press for a Sophomore Football Player?
The bench press is a standard football training exercise and requires a spotter. Photo Credit Ozimician/iStock/Getty Images

High school football is often the level where student athletes first seriously use weightlifting to improve on-field performance. A sophomore player at 15 or 16 years of age will likely be at the beginning of a strength-training regimen, and this coupled with the athlete’s base level of upper body strength will go a long way toward determining how much he should be bench pressing. There isn’t a specific weight suitable for all or most players at any level; the amount you should bench is entirely dependent on your current fitness level.

Strength Standards

While there are formalized strength standards that classify how much you should be able to bench based on your body weight and your experience level, those metrics are guidelines. And given the nature of strength training, you will want to push your bench weight upward continuously. According to ExRx.net, the standard bench press for an average novice player of 180 pounds is 130 lbs. -- which includes the weight of the bar. Use trial and error, along with the assistance of an experienced spotter, to help you find your base bench press weight. There’s a good chance that if you’ve actively played competitive sports prior to your sophomore year, you’ll be able to bench more than the listed strength standards table advises.

You Might Also Like

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

References

Demand Media