• You're all caught up!

Running Vs. Jump Roping Vs. Punching Bag

author image Kara Dickerson
Kara Dickerson started writing in 2010, with her health and fitness-related articles appearing on LIVESTRONG.COM and eHow. She is a registered nurse on a cardiac stepdown unit, a certified personal trainer at East Tennessee State University and a fitness instructor. Dickerson received her Bachelor of Science in nursing from East Tennessee State University.
Running Vs. Jump Roping Vs. Punching Bag
Cardio exercise provides a variety of health benefits. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

Running, jumping rope and boxing are all cardio exercises that effectively burn calories and increase your fitness level. All can help you lose or maintain weight with a regular exercise program. Pick the one that best suits your workout needs.


Running Vs. Jump Roping Vs. Punching Bag
Jumping rope burns significant calories. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

Running can be done without equipment and virtually anywhere. It can help lower your blood pressure. Some runners also experience a runner's high or feeling of euphoria from the increase of endorphins released while running. Jumping rope can be done at any age. The caloric burn is greater than running and in much less time. You can rev up your metabolism by doing 10 minutes of jumping compared with 30 minutes of jogging, and you'll burn the same number of calories. Jumping rope also improves coordination, increases bone density and tones your lower body. Jump ropes are relatively inexpensive pieces of equipment and easily packed for travel. Boxing helps define and tone your arms and upper body. Punching increases your core strength and improves your speed. If you keep moving while punching, you also receive the added benefits of a lower-body workout. It is also an outlet for aggression and stress relief.

You Might Also Like


Running Vs. Jump Roping Vs. Punching Bag
Boxing requires the most equipment. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Pixland/Getty Images

Weather is a problem with running, unless you own a treadmill or belong to a gym. Running outside year-round may not be possible, depending on where you live. With jumping rope, space can be an issue. If you don't have an open, flat area, you may have trouble jumping rope as part of your workout. Boxing may be difficult if you do not own the equipment or have never taken a class. A partner is not required but is helpful to critique form and hold the bag. To get the most from your workout, you need boxing gloves and a punching bag


Running can be done at a moderate pace but to increase the intensity, try interval workouts. Try running one to two minutes at a pace quicker than your baseline. Incorporate this frequently in your workout. Adding hills to your workout also helps keep your body from adapting and engages new muscles. To increase the difficulty of jumping rope, decrease the length of the rope you use. This increases your turnover rate, making you work harder. Weighted jump ropes are also available. Boxing has the most room for versatility. Incorporate your lower body to get more from your workout by kickboxing.


If you have any knee or joint pain problems, consult your doctor before performing any exercise regimens, especially jumping or running. Use caution with shoulder injuries. They can be aggravated by punching or jumping rope. You also want to consider the amount of money and time you are willing to spend on the activity.

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
  • Female
  • Male
ft. in.


Demand Media