zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

Which Amino Acids Are Contained in Milk & Eggs?

by
author image Melodie Anne
Melodie Anne Coffman specializes in overall wellness, with particular interests in women's health and personal defense. She holds a master's degree in food science and human nutrition and is a certified instructor through the NRA. Coffman is pursuing her personal trainer certification in 2015.
Which Amino Acids Are Contained in Milk & Eggs?
Milk and eggs are both complete protein foods. Photo Credit Visage/Stockbyte/Getty Images

Amino acids are tiny building blocks in the body. They stick together to form tissues, cells and organs. Your body even uses amino acids for digestion, growth, hormone production, brain signaling and other everyday biological processes. Since amino acids are essential for basic life functions, you need an array of them in your daily diet. Both milk and eggs are rich sources of amino acids, giving you healthy doses of each one.

Essential Amino Acids

Foods from animal sources, including milk and eggs, are known as complete proteins and have adequate levels of all of the essential amino acids. The nine essential amino acids include lysine, methionine, leucine, histidine, isoleucine, threonine, tryptophan, valine and phenylalanine. These amino acids are essential or necessary because they have to come from the foods in your daily diet. The body can’t make these amino acids, which isn’t the case for all types of amino acids.

Nonessential Amino Acids

Milk and eggs each contain nonessential amino acids too. These amino acids include glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine and asparagine. It isn’t necessary to get these amino acids in your daily diet, although it isn’t going to hurt you either. Your body has the ability to make nonessential amino acids as needed, so you should always have enough to keep your body running properly.

Conditional Amino Acids

Several amino acids fall into the conditional category. While they are typically nonessential nutrients, your body needs more of them when you’re very sick or recovering from an injury. Arginine, ornithine, proline, glutamine, serine, tyrosine, glycine and cysteine are all conditional amino acids. You’ll get these amino acids from milk and eggs as well.

Getting Enough

Rather than keeping tabs on how much of each amino acid you're getting, focus on your total protein intake. Amino acids fall into the overall protein recommendation, where protein should make up 10 to 35 percent of the calories in the diet, states the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Protein is a macronutrient with 4 calories per gram, and to meet the recommendation, you’ll need 50 to 175 grams of protein daily for a 2,000-calorie diet. Including milk and eggs in your diet can easily help you meet your protein needs. You’ll get around 8.5 grams of total protein -- including all the essential amino acids -- from an 8-ounce glass of reduced-fat milk. A large whole egg has nearly 6.5 grams of overall protein.

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

CURRENTLY TRENDING

Demand Media

Our Privacy Policy has been updated. Please take a moment and read it here.