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How to Cook a Pocket Roast

author image Rose Erickson
Rose Erickson has been a professional writer since 2010. She specializes in fitness, parenting, beauty, health, nutrition and saving money, and writes for several online publications including The Krazy Coupon Lady. She is also a novelist and a mother of three.
How to Cook a Pocket Roast
Woman putting roast in her oven. Photo Credit targovcom/iStock/Getty Images

A pocket roast, which is a cut of top round, sirloin or boneless beef roast, can be tough in texture and bland. However, stuffing the meat with oil, vegetables, herbs and spices can help impart flavor and tenderness into the meat. Because a pocket roast is large, about 5 lb., it makes an ideal meal for large crowds, holiday parties or other special occasions.

Step 1

Preheat your oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 2

Position your pocket roast in a large pan with the fat side facing upward. Cut about 12 slits downward into the meat with a sharp knife.

Step 3

Combine ingredients such as olive oil, fresh thyme, tomato paste and garlic in a bowl. Fill each meat pocket with the mixture and then rub the leftover mixture on the top of the roast.

Step 4

Wrap up your roast with approximately eight slices of prosciutto, tying up the ends to secure the roast.

Step 5

Bake in the oven until the top of the roast turns brown. Add about 1/2 cup of red wine or beef stock into the roasting pan alongside the roast.

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Step 6

Cover the roast with a sheet of aluminum foil and bake for about four hours.

Step 7

Remove your pocket roast from the oven and pan and allow it to rest for about 10 minutes on a cutting board. Serve as desired.

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