zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

How to Substitute Self Rising Flour Instead of All Purpose in Cookies

by
author image Elizabeth Nickelaid
Elizabeth Nickelaid is an editor and writer with more than 20 years' experience in the newspaper industry. She has won state and national awards for headline writing and has collaborated with Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Wake Forest University.
How to Substitute Self Rising Flour Instead of All Purpose in Cookies
Self-rising flour includes ingredients that all-purpose flour doesn't have. Photo Credit MASH/Photodisc/Getty Images

If you plan to make cookies and realize you don't have the all-purpose flour the recipe calls for, it might be worth a trip to the store to pick some up. Though you can substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose, depending on the recipe, the results are likely to differ from what you're used to. The cookies may have a different texture, be flatter or fluffier, be softer than usual and not brown well. If you can't get your hands on the correct flour, however, you may decide that the substitution is worth a try.

Step 1

Read the cookie recipe to see how much baking powder and salt are required. If the amount is less than 1 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon of salt per cup of flour, the substitution will not work well.

Step 2

Substitute 1 cup of self-rising flour for each cup of all-purpose flour in the recipe, if the recipe meets the requirements of Step 1.

You Might Also Like

Step 3

Omit 1 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon of salt for every cup of flour in the recipe. In most cases, this means you will not add baking powder or salt at all.

Step 4

Taste the first batch of cookies. If they lack flavor, add a bit of salt to the dough and try again.

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

References

Demand Media