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Can You Eat Edamame During Pregnancy?

by
author image Sara Ipatenco
Sara Ipatenco has taught writing, health and nutrition. She started writing in 2007 and has been published in Teaching Tolerance magazine. Ipatenco holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education, both from the University of Denver.
Can You Eat Edamame During Pregnancy?
Bowl of edamame Photo Credit bhofack2/iStock/Getty Images

Edamame is a fancy name for soybeans, which are a pea-like member of vegetable family that can be eaten fresh or purchased frozen. Edamame packs a large nutritional punch and the vegetable is safe during pregnancy in most cases. Always talk to your obstetrician before adding a new food to your pregnancy diet to be sure it's safe for you.

Eating Edamame For Two

As long as raw edamame has been thoroughly washed, you can safely consume it throughout your pregnancy. Though unwashed vegetables elevate your risk of being exposed to toxoplasmosis, a dangerous bacteria, washing the vegetable before eating it reduces your risk. If you purchase frozen edamame in bean form, it's safe to consume, as is.

Edamame 101

When you add edamame to your pregnancy diet, you're making a smart move that supplies a good dose of nutrition to your unborn baby. You'll get a good dose of fiber and folate, which helps prevent birth defects. You'll also get a good amount of iron and zinc, as well as small amounts of niacin.

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Adding Edamame to Your Diet

Eat edamame plain as a nutritious snack or add it to salad and soup recipes. Edamame will also add nutrition to your favorite stir-fry recipe. Puree cooked edamame with olive oil, herbs and spices to make a fiber and folic acid-rich dip that pairs well with pita chips or raw vegetables.

What to Consider First

If you're allergic to any other legumes, such as peanuts, or beans, talk to your obstetrician about whether edamame is safe for you. Consuming more than a serving or two a day of soy during pregnancy might interfere with proper nutrient absorption, which can impair your baby's growth.

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