• You're all caught up!

How to Correct the Sodium for Hyperglycemia

author image Stephen Christensen
Stephen Christensen started writing health-related articles in 1976 and his work has appeared in diverse publications including professional journals, “Birds and Blooms” magazine, poetry anthologies and children's books. He received his medical degree from the University of Utah School of Medicine and completed a three-year residency in family medicine at McKay-Dee Hospital Center in Ogden, Utah.
How to Correct the Sodium for Hyperglycemia
A high blood glucose level can interfere with accurate sodium measurements. Photo Credit Thinkstock/Stockbyte/Getty Images

Glucose is a simple sugar that is readily transported through your bloodstream and used by your cells for fuel. If your blood glucose increases significantly – a condition called hyperglycemia – it acts like a chemical sponge, drawing water from inside your cells and diluting the sodium outside your cells. While this does not change the total amount of sodium in your body, it can interfere with its accurate measurement. "The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy" reports that for every 100 mg/dL your blood glucose rises above normal, your sodium level falls about 1.6 mEq/L.

Step 1

Subtract 200 – the upper limit of normal blood glucose – from your blood glucose reading. For example, if your blood glucose reading is 350 mg/dL, the difference between your blood glucose and normal – your “glucose excess” – is 350 minus 200, or 150.

Step 2

Determine your “dilution factor” by dividing your glucose excess by 100. If your glucose excess is 150, your dilution factor is 150 divided by 100, or 1.5.

Step 3

Multiply your dilution factor by 1.6 to find your “sodium deficit.” If your dilution factor is 1.5, your sodium deficit is 1.6 multiplied by 1.5, or 2.4.

Step 4

Add your sodium deficit to your serum sodium measurement to determine your corrected sodium level. If your sodium deficit is 2.4 and your serum sodium level is 135 mEq/L, your corrected sodium is 135 plus 2.4, or 137.4 mEq/L.

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
  • Female
  • Male
ft. in.



Demand Media