zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

What is the Average Age for a Baby to Sit Up Alone?

by
author image Genevieve Van Wyden
Genevieve Van Wyden began writing in 2007. She has written for “Tu Revista Latina” and owns three blogs. She has worked as a CPS social worker, gaining experience in the mental-health system. Van Wyden earned her Bachelor of Arts in journalism from New Mexico State University in 2006.
What is the Average Age for a Baby to Sit Up Alone?
What is the Average Age for a Baby to Sit Up Alone? Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

You are probably curious about when your baby will be ready to sit up by himself. He starts getting control over larger muscles before learning to control the smaller muscles of his body. Cephalocaudal development involves learning muscle and body control beginning at the head and moving to the lower body. In this order, your baby learns to develop his head, upper trunk and arms first, according to Education.com.

Marking the Milestones

Your baby meets his developmental milestones, such as raising her head, rolling over and sitting, based on how her muscles develop. She also needs to figure out where her legs and arms should be so that, as she tries to sit, she doesn’t topple over. Before she can tackle sitting, her neck muscles must be strong enough to support her head as she holds it up. Normally, she will learn to get her arms under her torso and push herself over, rolling from front to back. She is learning to use her muscles to control her movements -- a development that begins at about 4 months.

You Might Also Like

Baby Has Skills

When your baby is a newborn lying in his crib, he learned how to turn his head to find interesting sounds, such as your voice. Once he learned this, he began working on learning to hold his head up. When you placed him on a blanket on the floor, he wanted to see what was around him, encouraging him to prop himself up on his arms and hold his head up as he looked at all the interesting new items in his environment. When he is about 4 months old, his neck muscles will rapidly grow stronger, helping him as he learns to sit up. Your baby’s physical development progresses from the central part of his body to the peripheral parts -- his arms and legs. He will learn control of larger muscles before learning fine muscle control. This is important to learning to sit.

Moving On

After your baby learns to control her neck and upper trunk muscles, she’ll start working on holding her chest off the ground. Once she has mastered this skill, she should be about 5 months old and able to sit for a minute or two without help. She then learns how to prop herself using her hands and stiffened arms on both sides of her body. This position doesn’t leave her hands free to play with one of her toys, so her next task is to learn to use her trunk muscles to support her body so she can play and sit at the same time.After figuring out how to prop herself up, she’ll learn to twist her trunk and push up from lying on her stomach into a sitting position. She should be about 8 months old by now and able to sit easily without much support.

Providing Support

As your baby is developing the necessary skills to sit independently, you can help him sit with help -- just make sure he has the necessary neck and trunk control first. Sit on the floor and spread your legs out. Place your baby into the V created by your legs and support him gently with your hands on both sides of his ribcage. Encourage him to prop himself up with his hands in front of him. As he is able to sit without propping himself with his hands, let him play with a toy as he sits near you. Be ready to catch him if he begins falling.

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

References

Demand Media