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How to Treat Hemorrhoids in a Child

by
author image Ivy Morris
Ivy Morris specializes in health, fitness, beauty, fashion and music. Her work has appeared in "Sacramento News and Review," "Prosper Magazine" and "Sacramento Parent Magazine," among other publications. Morris also writes for medical offices and legal practices. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in government-journalism from Sacramento State University.
How to Treat Hemorrhoids in a Child
Hemorrhoids can cause blood in the stool or on toilet paper. Photo Credit Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images

Millions of Americans suffer from hemorrhoids, according to the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Although hemorrhoids are most common after age 30, some children experience these enlarged, bulging blood vessels located in and around the anus and lower rectum. Hemorrhoids often cause bleeding during bowel movements, as well as itching, sensitivity or pain around the anus. A child with hemorrhoids might see blood on the toilet paper after a bowel movement. In most cases, at-home remedies can treat hemorrhoids, but severe hemorrhoids require medical attention in a doctor's office.

Step 1

Have your child take a daily warm bath, washing the anal area with warm water. Soap can irritate the hemorrhoids. Dry with a hair dryer.

Step 2

Help your child soak the anal area in plain warm water for 10 to 15 minutes two to three times a day. Dry the area with a hair dryer.

Step 3

Instruct your child, or help him, wipe the anal area with plain, unscented, moist towelettes, baby wipes or wet toilet paper after a bowel movement.

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Step 4

Ice the anus with a cold compresses, and give the appropriate child's dose of acetaminophen to relieve pain.

Step 5

Ask your child's doctor about using an over-the-counter hemorrhoid cream on the affected area, and follow the doctor's instructions for use.

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