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What Are the Benefits of African Mango?

author image Stephanie Lee
Stephanie Lee began writing in 2000 with concentration on food, travel, fashion and real estate. She has written for Amnesty International and maintains three blogs. Lee holds a Bachelor of Arts in international relations from the University of California, Irvine, and an M.B.A. from Concordia University.
What Are the Benefits of African Mango?
Many mangos including african mangos. Photo Credit pierivb/iStock/Getty Images

African mango, or Irvingia gabonensis, is indigenous to tropical rain forests of Guinea and while the flesh of the fruit has nutritional value, it is the pit, or the dikanut, that has been extensively studied for its medicinal properties. According to the Global Institute for Bioexploration, extract of the dikanut may help to alleviate diarrhea, diabetes, hernia and yellow fever, while leaf extracts may help to reduce fever. Clinical studies also support the pit of African mango as a treatment aid for obesity and elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein, or LDL cholesterol. Consult with your health care advisor prior to ingesting African mango.

Nutritional Content

Albert Ayena, Ph.D., of the Global Institute for Bioexploration, states that the oil contained in the fruit's seed is abundant in beta-carotene. National Institutes of Health explains that beta-carotene is effective at preventing certain cancers, high blood pressure, infertility, heartburn and some emotional and mental disorders. The seed is also rich in calcium, iron and B vitamins, as well as healthy fatty acids, such as myristic, lauric, palmitic, stearic and oleic acids. Fatty acids are essential for brain health, body function and muscular development.

Weight Loss

A study, led by Judith Ngondi, was published in the May 2005 edition of "Lipids in Health and Disease." Ngondi researched the effects that dikanut extract had on the weight of individuals diagnosed with obesity. The study consisted of 40 individuals that were divided into two groups, intervention and control. The intervention group ingested the pit extract of the African mango fruit thrice daily over a 4-week period while the control group was administered placebos. The results indicated that the intervention group experienced an average weight reduction of 5.26 lbs. while the control group lost an average of 1.32 lbs. Although further research is necessary to validate these claims, the results hold promise.


In the same 2005 study, Ngondi also noted that the subjects placed in the intervention group exhibited a significant reduction in blood lipid levels, which include triglycerides and LDL cholesterol. Furthermore, the participants' level of high density lipoprotein, otherwise known as the "good" cholesterol, showed marked improvements. The placebo group, on the other hand, exhibited no alterations to blood lipid levels.


Another study, published in the March 2009 edition of "Lipids in Health and Disease," also conducted by Ngondi, reported that the extract of the dikanut may help to improve blood-glucose levels in patients diagnosed with diabetes. The study was performed over a 10 week period and consisted of 100 overweight individuals. Similar to the previous study in 2005, the subjects were divided into two groups, intervention and placebo. The results indicated that African mango does have a positive impact on blood-glucose levels; however, further research is required.

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