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Deadlifts for Losing Weight

author image William McCoy
Toronto-based journalist William McCoy has been writing since 1997, specializing in topics such as sports, nutrition and health. He serves as the Studio's sports and recreation section expert. McCoy is a journalism graduate of Ryerson University.
Deadlifts for Losing Weight
A combination of exercise and diet can lead to weight loss. Photo Credit Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

The deadlift exercise, in which you bend your back and lift a barbell off the floor, can be an effective way to strengthen your back muscles and several other muscle groups. It's not, however, likely to lead to weight loss on its own. Weight training can play a role in weight loss, but must be paired with exercise and dietary changes. Always consult your doctor before beginning this or any exercise regimen.

Largely Ineffective on Its Own

Weight-training exercises, including deadlifts, burn calories at an extremely slow rate. Harvard Health Publications reports the rate that you burn calories while lifting weights is comparable to bowling and only about a third of the rate of using an elliptical trainer. Even with its low calorie burn, lifting weights plays a role in weight loss by elevating your metabolism.

Use Exercise and Diet

Losing weight requires a commitment to diet and exercise. By focusing on both areas, rather than just one, you significantly improve your odds of finding success. Adults should endeavor to perform aerobic exercise about 300 minutes per week, find time for two or more strength-training workouts and reduce their daily caloric intake.

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