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The Gallbladder and Bananas

author image Meg Campbell
Based just outside Chicago, Meg Campbell has worked in the fitness industry since 1997. She’s been writing health-related articles since 2010, focusing primarily on diet and nutrition. Campbell divides her time between her hometown and Buenos Aires, Argentina.
The Gallbladder and Bananas
Eating fruit can reduce your risk of gallstones. Photo Credit hookmedia/iStock/Getty Images

The main purpose of your gallbladder is to store and concentrate bile, a digestive fluid your small intestine uses to break down fats. Gallbladder problems are fairly common in developed nations -- roughly 25 million Americans have gallstones, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. The health of your gallbladder can be influenced by a variety of factors, including the quality of your overall diet.

If you have gallstones, they should be treated by a physician.

Bananas and Your Gallbladder

Eating a balanced, wholesome diet -- one that provides plenty of fiber and some unsaturated fat and is otherwise low in sugar and saturated fat -- supports gallbladder health. Although bananas do contain sugar, its absorption is buffered by dietary fiber -- an average-sized fruit supplies about 3 grams of fiber, or 12 percent of the recommended daily value based on a 2,000-calorie diet.

A high fiber intake has been linked to a reduced risk for developing gallstones, and getting that fiber from fresh produce may have additional benefits: People who eat plenty of fruits and vegetables may be less likely to develop the kind of gallstones that require surgery.

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