zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

Bumps & Warts on the Inner Thighs of Children

by
author image Natalie Smith
Natalie Smith is a technical writing professor specializing in medical writing localization and food writing. Her work has been published in technical journals, on several prominent cooking and nutrition websites, as well as books and conference proceedings. Smith has won two international research awards for her scholarship in intercultural medical writing, and holds a PhD in technical communication and rhetoric.
Bumps & Warts on the Inner Thighs of Children
Child wearing pediatrician's stethoscope and giving thumbs up Photo Credit Comstock Images/Stockbyte/Getty Images

When you notice suspicious bumps or warts on the inner thighs of your child, you will naturally feel concerned and you may have many questions. You may wonder what the bumps or warts are and how they got there -- they may be one of several different conditions. Consult your pediatrician to diagnose the problem and get treatment for your child.

Molluscum Contagiosum

Those fleshy bumps that you see on the inside of your child's thighs may not be warts. These could be wart-like bumps from an infection called "molluscum contagiosum." Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus and it is communicable by touching an open lesion or touching objects like toys or clothing that are contaminated with the virus. This illness is characterized by fleshy bumps with or without a dimple on the top. The infection often goes away on its own over time, according to The National Institutes of Health, but your pediatrician may choose to burn or freeze off the bumps.

You Might Also Like

Warts

Common warts as well as genital warts are transmitted by a virus. Children are more susceptible to common warts than adults are, according to the KidsHealth website. While common warts usually appear on the hands or feet, they can appear anywhere on the body. In rare instances, a child may catch genital warts either through being sexually abused by an adult who is infected with the warts or by contracting them from a mother who has an active case of warts while going through the birth canal. Your pediatrician can remove the warts as well as examine your child if you suspect she obtained the warts through sexual abuse.

Folliculitis

If the bumps are small or red, they may be caused by infected hair follicles on the thighs, or folliculitis. This is caused by a bacterial infection, such as staph. If you suspect that your child has folliculitis, contact your pediatrician, especially if she has been in contact with someone who has an active staph infection or if the bumps grow larger and more painful. The pediatrician may treat a minor infection with a topical antibiotic or oral antibiotics.

When to Consult a Pediatrician

If your child is in pain, if the bumps grow larger or spread, or if your child runs a fever or begins to exhibit other symptoms, contact your pediatrician. The bumps may be just a rash that is a side effect of a minor infection or the result of contact dermatitis, but they might indicate a more serious illness. Your pediatrician can determine the cause of the bumps and recommend a treatment plan for your child.

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

References

Demand Media