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The Best Way to Cook a Pork Steak Using a Rub

author image Sara Ipatenco
Sara Ipatenco has taught writing, health and nutrition. She started writing in 2007 and has been published in Teaching Tolerance magazine. Ipatenco holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education, both from the University of Denver.
The Best Way to Cook a Pork Steak Using a Rub
Close up of a pork steak with potatoes Photo Credit Eskstock/iStock/Getty Images

A pork steak is cut from a pork butt, which comes from the shoulder of a hog. Pork steaks, often called blade steaks, have a mild flavor so they can be seasoned with a wide variety of herbs and spices. A rub is a seasoning method that blends dried herbs and spices together; it is then rubbed into your meat to infuse it with a bold flavor. Grilling is the best method for cooking a pork steak using a rub, and will yield a moist, tender and flavorful piece of meat.


Rubs are used to enhance the flavor of your meat. Most rubs are dry rubs, which means they contain several dried herbs and spices. A dry rub might also contain other taste-enhancing dry ingredients, such as brown sugar. You can put a rub on your pork steak several hours before you plan to grill it, or you can rub it in just prior to placing it on the grill. Rick Tramonto, author of "Steak with Friends: At Home, with Rick Tramonto," notes that there are no rules when it comes to making a rub. Use the seasonings you prefer and experiment with combinations to find the one you like best.

Suggested Spices

While most herbs and spices combine well with the mild taste of a pork steak, certain seasonings might enhance the flavor more effectively. Bold spices, such as paprika, dried mustard, chili powder, thyme and rosemary, blend well with a pork steak. A pinch of brown sugar will add a bit of sweetness to your rub that complements the taste of the bolder herbs and spices. Minced garlic cloves are a tasty addition to a pork dry rub as well.


To make enough rub to season a pork steak, you will need enough spices to equal about 1 cup. Choose a base spice, such as paprika, and measure out 1/2 cup into a small bowl. Add 1/4 cup of a complementary seasoning, such as chili powder or ground mustard. Add 2 tablespoons each of three additional spices, such as garlic powder, thyme, rosemary, sage, oregano, black pepper or cumin. Sprinkle in two or three additional spices to boost the flavor. Mince 2 garlic cloves and add to your rub, if desired. Rub the mixture over both sides of your pork steak, generously coating all areas with as much rub as you have.

Cooking Process

Preheat your outdoor grill to medium-high heat. Brush the grates with olive oil and immediately place your pork steak on the grill. Close the lid and cook the steak for 3 to 4 minutes. Flip the steak and cook for an additional 3 to 4 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium and close the lid. Cook your steak for an additional 6 to 10 minutes, depending on the thickness of the meat. Use a meat thermometer to ensure your pork steak is cooked through. It should reach an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit. Transfer to a serving platter and cover loosely with aluminum foil. Allow the meat to rest for 5 minutes, which will seal the juices inside.

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